Columbia University: How to Apply for 2024, Acceptance Rate, and What To Expect as a Columbia Film Student

columbia_shutterstock_1065178328.jpg
At Columbia University School of the Arts, film is approached as storytelling in motion. Filmmakers learn future-forward visual and narrative filmmaking techniques while mastering the technicalities and business aspects of the industry. In 2023, The Hollywood Reporter also ranked the ivy league university no. 7 in its annual list of the top 25 American film schools. And in 2022, FilmSchool.org ranked Columbia University among the top 10 undergraduate film programs in the U.S. and runner-up for Best Screenwriting Program worldwide.

Film classes are taught by Academy Award winners, such as James Schamus (Moonrise Kingdom, The Pianist), and Academy Award nominees, such as Ramin Bahrani (The White Tiger, 99 Homes).

FilmSchool.org's exclusive interview with the Columbia University Admissions and Industry Outreach offers an in-depth overview of how to apply, plus how to maximize networking opportunities for film students.

What is life like at Columbia University?


From the Metropolitan Museum of Art to Manhattan’s timeless Quad Theater, Columbia University film students have a wealth of inspiration within a short walk, bus trip, or train ride. The university is located on the upper west side of Manhattan at 116th and Broadway. Beautiful greenery, such as the South Lawns and Morningside Park, are near the university's historic residence halls.

Film students report using a variety of light packages and shooting on cameras such as the Canon C200, Panasonic AU-EVA1, and Sony FS5. ARRI cameras are available for advanced film shoots. Additionally, the Digital Media Center assists graduate film students with their coursework.

For an inside look at Columbia University's graduate film programs, read FilmSchool.org's interview with Columbia MFA student Patrick Clement and check out our Current Film Student Ask Me Anything (AMA) threads. You can also send general questions for current Columbia University students to askastudent@columbia.edu.

Renowned Columbia University film program alumni


Columbia University alumni dominate the Emmys, the Peabody Awards, and other historic platforms for outstanding films. Here are a three noteworthy alumni from its BA and MFA and film degree programs:

Writer-director-producer Kathryn Bigelow (MFA, ‘79) became the first woman to win the Academy Award for Best Director for The Hurt Locker.

Writer-director-producer Lisa Cholodenko (MFA, ‘97) wrote and directed Olive Kitteridge and nabbed the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Directing for a Limited Series. Most recently, she directed the Hulu limited series The Girl from Plainville starring Elle Fanning.

Writer-director-producer Anna Winger (BA, ‘93) created the Netflix limited series Unorthodox. In 2021, Winger entered a partnership with the streaming service.

10 commonly asked questions about Columbia University


1. What makes Columbia University exceptional?


Columbia University trains students to become total filmmakers by equally learning all aspects of film. Film students can pursue a variety of industry and academic careers. Instructors expose students to films in all genres and mediums to help them create projects with comprehensive perspectives. By the end of their programs, film students master storytelling from conception to production.

2. Is Columbia University test optional?


Yes. Columbia University does not require the SAT, ACT, or GRE.

3. What is the average GPA of Columbia University applicants?


There is no hard and fast minimum GPA requirement for Columbia's graduate and undergraduate film programs. However, you should aim for a competitive score: According to Campusreel.org, the average Columbia University student has a minimum GPA of 3.91.

FilmSchool.org's Application Database allows members to see the accepted GPAs of admitted Columbia applicants; scores vary from high to low. Review our Acceptance Statistics page for Columbia's Screenwriting & Directing (MFA) for more information. FilmSchool.org's Application Database allows you to sort applications according to GPA.

4. Can I apply to more than one MFA film program?


Yes. Applicants can apply to two or more MFA film programs per application cycle, but they must submit separate applications and pay two application fees.

5. How important is the Columbia University film portfolio?


Columbia University School of the Arts has a holistic admissions process. Each section of the application is positioned as an opportunity to tell the admissions committee what makes you the best fit for the BA or MFA program. Construct your portfolio to demonstrate your passion for film, the talents you will bring to your program, and your artistic credo.

6. Do all applicants receive an interview?


The Office of Undergraduate Admissions interviews undergraduate applicants according to how many volunteers are available; interviews are not required for acceptance.

The Office of Graduate Admissions requires an interview for acceptance; only a select number of graduate applicants receive interviews.

FilmSchool.org's Acceptance Statistics pages for Screenwriting & Directing (MFA) and Creative Producing (MFA) also show the percentage of members who were admitted after an interview.

7. Do the MFA Film Programs emphasize collaboration?


Yes. Both the MFA Creative Producing and Screenwriting/Directing cohorts work closely together to create short films. The 8-12 minute film at the end of year 2 allows Creative Producing students to actualize Directing students’ best works.

The 8-12 minute film project also helped create film crews for major motion pictures like Boys Don’t Cry, American Splendor, and Monsoon Wedding.

8. Are film students allowed to work part-time?


New York City is one of the most expensive cities in the U.S., and students should plan accordingly to finance their degrees. Part-time jobs on or off campus are permitted, but the Office of Admissions advises students to account for a heavy course load. Classes run Monday to Friday and often last over 8 hours.

9. Is student housing available?


Columbia Housing offers undergraduate-exclusive residence halls where film students have a safe, inclusive space to study and form lifelong friendships. The program guarantees housing to all students (except visiting students) who apply to live on campus and study full-time for up to four years; freshmen are required to live on campus (excluding sororities). Eligible students may receive special housing accommodations.

Graduate applicants do not have guaranteed housing. If admitted, they can apply for dormitory-style rooms and apartment shares through the Columbia University Apartment Housing program.

10. If I withdraw from my program, can I reapply?


Yes, if you attended Columbia University within the past five years. Request the paper application to reapply by contacting soaadmissions@columbia.edu. For more information, read “Readmission for Former Students” on the official Columbia University website.

Editor's Note: This article has been revised to reflect 2024 application instructions. The Columbia University application for 2024 admission is now open to undergraduates (click here to apply). The graduate application for 2023 admission opens October 1, 2023.

Continue reading...​

Columbia University Acceptance Rate

Columbia University has an overall acceptance rate of 5.1%, according to Ivycoach.com. The undergraduate class of 2027 admitted only 3.9% of more than 50,000 applicants. The graduate film program is also highly selective: 8% of Screenwriting/Directing applicants and 4% of Creative Producing applicants are admitted each year.

Filmschool.org members have seen slightly higher acceptance rates:









Rejected applicants are encouraged to reapply the following admissions cycle. Transcripts and letters of recommendation are retained for one calendar year and can only be repurposed once. All other materials — such as English proficiency scores, the online application (with the non-refundable application fee), and creative materials — cannot be repurposed.

If you are rejected by the same program or concentration for three consecutive years, you cannot reapply the following admissions cycle.

Showcase your films at Columbia University Film Festival (CUFF)

Each year, Columbia University School of the Arts hosts the Columbia University Film Festival (CUFF), an eight-day celebration of thesis projects during the spring semester. The festival takes place in New York and Los Angeles and helps students and alumni connect with directors, producers, casting agents, and other critical industry players.

There are two award categories: Film and Script. CUFF presents over a dozen named awards, including the Zaki Gordon Memorial Award for Excellence in Screenwriting — won by Patrick Clement (G’20) in 2021. (Discover more about Patrick’s experience attending Columbia University in his interview with FilmSchool.org).

Alumni and faculty filmmakers are also regularly selected for prestigious external award shows, such as the Telluride Film Festival and Venice International Film Festival.

Columbia University Cost of Attendance, Financial Aid, and Scholarships

As a prestigious Ivy League institution of higher education, Columbia University School of the Arts is one of the more expensive film schools nationwide. film school students have access to high-quality equipment and facilities, as well as award-winning instructors. Additionally, Columbia University is tuition-free to undergraduate students with families that earn under $150,000 per year. The university also awards $13 million in scholarships, teaching assistantships, and grants each year. The average grant awarded is $63,971.

The typical applicant should prepare to use a combination of Columbia University scholarships, third party scholarships, personal savings, and government financial aid to fund their BA or MFA degree. Filmschool.org's Application Database also provides an overview of the total scholarship amounts received by Filmschool.org members within each graduate program's Admissions Statistics page. Take a look:
Keep reading for a breakdown of the cost of attendance for undergraduates and graduates, financial aid eligibility, and funding for international students, plus Federal Work-Study and scholarship opportunities.

Cost of undergraduate attendance (Fall 2023-Spring 2024)​


Academics
  • Tuition: $65,524
  • New student fee: $615
  • Books and personal: $3,672
Cost of Living
  • Room and board: $16,156
Total cost of attendance (first-year students): $85,967

Room and board fees vary year by year and reflect the cost of living in New York City. In addition, all first-year students must pay to live on campus. the cost breakdown reflects a student living in a residence hall. For more information, visit Student Financial Services.

Undergraduate applicants with families that earn less than $66,000 per year are not expected to contribute toward the cost of tuition. Additionally, freshmen applicants from low-income families receive a $2,000 start-up grant to streamline transitioning into college.

Undergraduate financial aid eligibility requirements​


Undergraduate students are expected to borrow $0 to attend Columbia University. The undergraduate financial aid process requires the steps:
  1. Submit the FAFSA: The application for federal financial aid opens on October 1, 2022. Use school code 002707.
  2. Make your CSS profile: To obtain institutional aid, including the Columbia University Grant, make your CSS profile starting October 1, 2022.
  3. Provide tax documentation: Upload tax documents for you and your parents (or step-parents or guardians) to determine eligibility for the Columbia Grant.
  4. Complete the Outside Scholarship and External Payment Form: Upload this form if you need more than Columbia’s institutional aid.
Columbia University encourages prospective applicants to use the estimated cost calculator. Undergraduate applicants who expect they will need additional funds after they receive their financial aid package can file an appeal.

Note: Transfer students are not eligible for scholarships through Columbia University, but are encouraged to seek third party scholarships and federal financial aid.

Undergraduate and graduate billing schedule


Film students are billed online via the Columbia UNI account with Student Account Statements. Students are sent a link to their statements each term (also available at ssol.columbia.edu). The monthly payment plan may help you manage the cost of attendance.

Fall billing is spread across four statements; spring billing is spread across six statements; and summer billing is spread across two statements. Bills not paid by the first due date of the semester will incur a $150 late fee. Click here to learn more about the billing schedule.

Cost of graduate attendance (Fall 2023-Spring 2024)​


Academics

Years 1-2

  • Tuition: $71,918
  • Career Services fee: $160
  • Student Activity fee: $90
  • University Services and Support fee: $1,144
  • Health Services fee: $1,364
  • Medical Insurance: $4,541

Years 3-5 (Research Arts)
  • Tuition: $5,944
  • Film MFA Thesis Fee: $5,112
  • Career Services Fee: $160
  • Student Activity Fee: $180
  • University Services and Support Fee: $1,144
  • Health Service Fee: $1,364
  • Medical Insurance*: $4,541

Room and Board (Cost of Living)
  • Food and Housing: $25,560
  • Transportation: $1,143
  • Personal Expenses: $6,237
  • Books & Supplies: $2,874

Total cost of attendance for years 1-2: $115,031
Total cost of attendance for years 3-5 (Research Arts): $54,169

Living expenses are rough estimates and vary by semester. The total cost does not reflect additional academic fees, such as course or lab fees of $30-$125 per course and late payment or registration fees of $150 or more. To help offset additional costs, Columbia University School of the Arts offers a limited number of Teaching Assistantships; these two-year positions pay over $24,000.

Domestic graduate students can request a waiver for the Columbia Student Health Insurance plan by submitting an application. The application must be submitted at the beginning of the academic year along with proof of coverage.

International students must be insured by Columbia University’s health plan, unless they provide proof of coverage through a U.S.-based, employer-sponsored, group health plan as a primary, spouse, or dependent. Learn more about Columbia University's health insurance plan.

Graduate financial aid eligibility requirements​


Financial aid is need-blind, meaning that your financial background will not affect the admissions process. Full-time (12-18 credits per semester) graduate students have first priority for Columbia University School of the Arts scholarships. Filmmakers in their thesis year(s) are billed at a much lower Research Arts rate and rarely receive institutional scholarship support; graduate students must also pay thesis fees.

To apply for institutional aid, follow these steps:
  1. Choose the pull-down menu option in your School of the Arts MFA Application for Admission stating that you wish to be considered for institutional aid.
  2. U.S. Citizens and Permanent Residents only: Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid form at www.studentaid.gov by February 1st, 2023. (Use school code 002707.)
  3. All MFA applicants: Complete the online School of the Arts Financial Aid Application by February 1, 2022 for admission in the fall of 2022.
Institutional and federal aid are not awarded during the summer semester; graduate students must plan accordingly for the D4 film project and living expenses. Prepare in advance by reviewing the School of the Arts financial checklist.

Funding for international students


Each year, Columbia University awards an average of $19 million in financial aid. International students are not eligible for federal student aid, so the University provides funding through institutional resources. The average award for international financial aid recipients is $66,350, usually encompassing a Columbia grant (non-repayable) and work-study.

International students who need supplementary funds may be eligible for loans from U.S. lenders; many of these loans require a credit-worthy U.S. resident or permanent non-U.S. resident as a co-signer. Learn more about qualifying for international student loans. The University recommends these available lenders.

Federal Work-Study and scholarships for film students


Columbia University offers a need-based Federal Work-Study (FWS) program to financially support film students through part-time employment. Positions are available throughout the university and within the off-campus community, including research-based roles and managing live events. Funds are dispersed from July 1 through June of the following year. To apply, you must meet these requirements:
Columbia University awards scholarships based on academic achievement, ethnic identity, and other factors. Additionally, New York State offers grants, scholarships, and loans to New York residents attending part-time or full-time film degree programs.

How to Apply to Columbia University's BA in Film and Media Studies for 2024 Entry

Katharina Otto-Bernstein Screening Room at the Lenfest Center for the Arts (c) Frank Oudeman-2.jpg
Columbia University's BA in Film Studies program teaches undergraduates how to become scholars and accomplished writers of film by primarily analyzing films, scripts, and filmmaking techniques to create one short film or screenplay.

BA in Film and Media Studies students analyze the history and cultural significance of film to gain technical and theoretical knowledge needed for industry careers. Many students build their portfolios through Columbia Undergraduate Film Productions, a student-run filmmaking organization.

The program is open to undergraduate students at Columbia College, the School of General Studies, and Barnard College; 12 courses (36 credits total) are required to complete the major. Undergraduate students declare the Film Studies major by the beginning of their sophomore year.

Alumni pursue careers in film as well as film distribution, public relations, and film archival. Take a look at the program overview.

Years 1-2


Undergraduate filmmakers complete their general education courses through their constituent college, as well as the core prerequisite course for the major: Introduction to Film and Media Studies (FILM UN1000). FILM UN1000 is offered at the start of each semester and examines film through the lens of aesthetics, history, theory, and criticism.

By the end of year 2 (upon successful completion of FILM UN1000), students declare the Film and Studies major.

Years 3-4​


Laboratories in Screenwriting (FILM UN2420), Fiction Filmmaking (FILM UN2510), and Nonfiction Filmmaking (FILM UN2520) prepare students to develop their own creative projects. To graduate with honors, students can take the Senior Seminar in Film Studies (FILM UN3900), a course that requires a thesis project that demonstrates high-level proficiency in cinematic criticism.

There is a cap of four screenwriting and filmmaking classes that can be counted towards the major. Popular electives include American Film: Noir, Seeing Narrative, and the Senior Seminars in Film Studies, Screenwriting, and Filmmaking.

In year 4, advanced courses allow students to apply theoretical, cultural, and historical studies to screenplays and short films. The Senior Seminar in Filmmaking (FILM UN3910) allows students to make short thesis films while learning how to distribute and market their work. The Senior Seminar in Screenwriting (FILM UN3920) gives students the opportunity to write and revise a 30-page screenplay.

How to Apply​


Before you apply to the BA in Film and Media Studies program, make sure your high school coursework meets the minimum requirements (homeschooled applicants have these unique guidelines). Prepare to submit the following:
  1. Common Application, Coalition Application, or QuestBridge Application (for finalists only) — Each version of the core application requires a mandatory personal essay; list of personal achievements, academic accolades, and employment history; and autobiographical information.
  2. Columbia-Specific questions: Applicants must explain why they are a good fit for Columbia University by answering these questions.
  3. Secondary school profile: Provide official transcripts from all high schools attended, one high school counselor’s recommendation, your school profile, and one completed mid-year report.
  4. Two letters of recommendation: Provide letters from two high school instructors who taught you in academic courses.
  5. Application fee: Applicants must pay the non-refundable $85 fee.
    • If the application fee poses a financial burden, applicants can determine if they are eligible for an application fee waiver by submitting this form.
In 2022, Columbia University instated its test-optional policy for all freshmen applicants. Additionally, creative materials are not required for the BA in Film and Media Studies program.

If Columbia University is your top choice for undergraduate film studies, consider applying Early Decision. If admitted, you agree to withdraw all other applications and accept your offer. Early Decision applicants can be admitted, deferred (delegated to the Regular Decision pool and notified by April 1), or denied admission. For more information about deadlines, see "Columbia University Application Deadlines and What to Expect After Applying").

If your application will be late due to a medical emergency or a natural disaster, email an extension request as soon as possible to ugrad-ask@columbia.edu.

For even more information about the undergraduate application process, read Columbia University's online FAQs.

How to Apply to Columbia University's Screenwriting & Directing MFA for 2024 Entry

Production Center at Nash (c) Joel Jares.jpg
The Screenwriting & Directing MFA program is Columbia University’s pillar program for aspiring directors. Film students learn storytelling for film, television, and emerging digital media through intensive writing and directing projects across genres. Film students attend rigorous writing workshops where they develop and refine short- and long-form script projects under the guidance of industry experts and peer-to-peer feedback.

Columbia University encourages cross-disciplinary collaboration: Creative Producing and Screenwriting & Directing students share a common first-year curriculum and second-year electives. This set-up helps film students enter the industry with an array of professional contacts and a deeper understanding of the relationship between writing and directing.

Before you apply, read the year-by-year curriculum breakdown for the Screenwriting & Directing program and application requirements taken directly from Columbia University’s website.

Year 1 (fall)


Film students begin with Columbia’s Core Curriculum. These courses emphasize essential elements of directing, narrative storytelling, and production, and they are taken by students in all graduate degree programs:
  • Directing I
  • Directing Actors I
  • Elements of Dramatic Narrative
  • Ethics & Inclusive Storytelling
  • Fundamentals of Directing
  • Practical Production I
    Screenwriting I

Year 1 (spring)​


The spring curriculum builds upon filmmaking and storytelling principles mastered in the fall semester in the following courses:
  • Directing II
  • Directing Actors II
  • Practical Production II
  • Role of the Producer
  • Screenwriting II
  • Script to Screen
  • Secrets of the Short
  • Analysis of Film Language (recommended)
    Intro to Pilot

Year 1 (summer)


Screenwriting & Directing students complete an 8-12 minute film production.

Year 2​


In the second year of the MFA program, students in the Screenwriting & Directing concentration take required courses and supplement these courses with a wide range of electives.

Screenwriting—Year 2 courses

Screenwriting III*
Screenwriting IV*
Fundamentals of Editing

(*Note: Screenwriting III/IV is a year-long course taught by the same instructor.)

Screenwriting concentrates also have priority for TV Writing: Pilot, which is required for those who plan to do television writing for their thesis. Screenwriters may take Year 2 courses in Directing and Directing Actors, and some Producing courses as electives.

Directing—Year 2 courses

Directing III
Directing IV
Directing Actors III or IV
Fundamentals of Editing

Directors may take Second Year Courses in Screenwriting and/or TV Writing, and some Producing courses as electives.

Year 2 elective classes

Business of Television
Digital Storytelling I: History and Theory of Interactivity
Digital Storytelling II: Building Storyworlds
Intro to Cinematography
First Features
Story Gym
Story Structure
TV Directing
TV Writing: Pilot
Visual Experiences

Year 2 (summer)​


D4 film production – a more ambitious short film, directed by a member of the Directing 4 class. After completion of concentration requirements and 60 credits in the first two years of study, the third year and beyond is devoted to thesis work and to special classes contributing to the completion of the thesis. There are also several advanced non-credit workshops that are open exclusively to students in their thesis years.

Year 3​


Year 3 (and beyond) I devoted to thesis work and to special classes contributing to the completion of the thesis, also known as the Research Arts years. There are also several advanced non-credit workshops that are open exclusively to students in their thesis years.

Screenwriting—Year 3

Screenwriting concentrates must take the following required courses:
  • Script Revision – (required of all Screenwriting concentrates in the third year)
  • TV Revision – (required of all Screenwriting concentrates who wish to do thesis work in TV Writing)

Directors—Year 3 required classes

Screenwriting concentrates must take the following required courses:
  • Directing Thesis Advisement

Screenwriting Electives (for thesis students

These courses are open to Directing concentrates, although priority goes to Screenwriting concentrates:
  • Advanced Feature Writing
  • Advanced Pilot Writing
  • Advanced Screenplay Revision

The thesis period allows Screenwriting & Directing students to exclusively focus on honing their creative projects; courses for credit are no longer required. However, graduate students are encouraged to attend thesis development and preparation workshops and master classes with guest filmmakers. Master classes are led by industry experts and explore TV directing, directing the first feature, writing and directing comedies, pitching, advanced editing, and film scoring.

How to Apply​


Prepare to submit the following materials (from Columbia University School of the Arts's website):
  1. Autobiographical essay: Four to six double-spaced pages. (Tell us something about yourself and your background, artistic experiences, creative influences, and professional objectives.)
  2. Dramatic Writing Sample: A log line must be included. No more than 10 pages. Must be in screenplay format and must contain dialogue. This can be a complete short screenplay or the first ten pages of a screenplay. It must be original; it may not be an adaptation, except of your own work in another form. Please do not submit writing in prose form and no theater plays. The story cannot be the same as the one in your feature film treatment or your optional video submission.
  3. Film prompt:Read the following openings, choose one and imagine the scene that might follow it. The scene you write must include both dialogue and description. It should be no less than two and no more than three pages long. It should be written in screenplay format. These prompts change every year. The prompts listed below correspond to the Fall 2023 application. You may change the gender of any character in these prompts, but do not change ages or relationships:
    1. INT. APARTMENT - NEW YEARS EVE: With a smile plastered firmly into place, the woman begins backing away from the chaotic party down a darkened hallway. Intending to make a hasty exit, she locates her coat on a bed – but is shocked to discover just who is underneath it.
    2. INT. DORM ROOM - LATE NIGHT: The two students sit side by side admiring their handiwork: a pail of water sitting atop the bedroom door, rigged to fall on whoever enters next. They peer at a wall clock and then lean forward, straining to hear any approaching footsteps.
    3. INT. HIGH SCHOOL LOCKER ROOM - DAY: Long after the other students have left for home, one student remains in the locker room, frozen in place, staring into the grimy mirror. Just then, a janitor enters with a mop and pail – startled to find anyone still at school.
  4. Feature film treatment: On one double-spaced page for a film you might wish to write, direct or produce based on your application concentration. The treatment must concisely relate a complete dramatic story sufficient to sustain a feature-length film, including major characters and plot developments and a clear statement of the resolution. The story cannot be the same as the one in your dramatic writing sample or your optional video submission. You must state the genre of your treatment and a log line. On a separate page, please state the genre, major characters and a log line for the film. On a separate page, please state the genre, major characters and a log line for the film. A log line is one or two sentences that describe the protagonist(s) and the story of the film.
  5. Visual Submission (not required, but strongly suggested for Screenwriting & Directing Film Concentration applicants): Your visual submission should be uploaded to the Video Upload section of the online application and cannot be linked to a third-party such as YouTube or Vimeo. Submit one of the following:
    1. Film/Video Work: All Film MFA applicants may submit up to 30 minutes of film/video work. This material should be uploaded to the Video Upload section of the online application. It is advisable to put the best work at the beginning of your visual submission.
    2. Visual Exercise: Applicants for Directing who have not shot prior visual material are encouraged to shoot and submit the following OPTIONAL VISUAL EXERCISE: Write and shoot a 2-person SILENT SCENE (no dialogue), between one and two minutes long, which deals with the idea of "COMING TOGETHER." It could be two strangers who make a connection, a fighting couple who then make amends, or two people who 'come together' in anger, physicality or any other dramatic situation you choose.
    3. You may use subjects of any genders or ages, and any locations and props, etc. that you have available to you. Elaborate production expense is NOT the goal of this part of the application. You may shoot in any format.

Filmschool.org admitted student perspective


Filmschool.org member@cms9607 says of the application process:

“Columbia's application was [interesting] compared to the other schools, because it felt like the most bare bones. The other applications required varying degrees of extra [materials] outside of writing prompts. Columbia's… seemed more focused on just the writing. That made me worried, at first. I thought I needed all the extra fluff to make me look like a better candidate. In the end, I think it was my style in writing that got me admitted.”

Read about their film background and scholarship award amount.

Ready to apply?​


The Columbia graduate application for film students opens on October 1, 2023. Click here to start your application before the deadline (see “Columbia University Application Deadlines and What to Expect After Applying”).

How to Apply to Columbia University's Writing for Film & Television MFA for 2024 Entry

As the newes graduate film program at Columbia University, Writing for Film & Television MFA program nurtures talented storytellers who aim to develop the skills and professional network for careers in screenplay and teleplay writing. The School of the Arts not only helps aspiring screenwriters better define their creative voices and understand the broad impact of the stories they tell, but also helps many of them make the transition into writers’ rooms for popular TV and film productions worldwide.

Under the guidance of full-time faculty supported by prolific guest speakers and adjunct lecturers, Writing for Film & Television MFA students spend three years learning how to construct character-based narratives in long-form structures in their own voices. The degree program welcomes writers across all backgrounds and fosters individuality. Film students graduate with a mastery of must-have elements for exceptional storytelling, ready-to-pitch screenplays, and industry experience.

Faculty include screenwriter Andy Bienen (Boys Don’t Cry), Peabody Award-winning screenwriter Trey Ellis (The Tuskegee Airmen, Good Fences), and Academy Award nominated screenwriter and concentration head Christina Lazaridi (One Day Crossing, Nobody’s Watching).

Before you apply, read the year-by-year curriculum breakdown for the Writing for Film & Television MFA program and application requirements taken directly from Columbia University’s website.

Year 1 (fall)​


Film students begin with Columbia’s Core Curriculum. These courses emphasize essential elements of directing, narrative storytelling, and production, and they are taken by students in all film MFA programs:
  • Directing I
  • Directing Actors I
  • Elements of Dramatic Narrative
  • Ethics & Inclusive Storytelling
  • Fundamentals of Directing
  • Practical Production I
    Screenwriting I

Year 1 (spring)​


The spring curriculum builds upon filmmaking and storytelling principles mastered in the fall semester in the following courses:
  • Directing II
  • Directing Actors II
  • Practical Production II
  • Role of the Producer
  • Screenwriting II
  • Script to Screen
  • Secrets of the Short
  • Analysis of Film Language (recommended)
    Intro to Pilot

Year 1 (summer)​


Writing for Film & Television MFA students complete an 8-12 minute film production.


Film & Media Studies (FMS) requirement​


All graduate film students must take at least one course in Film & Media Studies (“FMS”) that count toward the 60 credits required for graduation. To get a teaching assistantship, film students should take more than one FMS course for graduate students:

  • Analysis of Film Language
  • Black Film & Media
  • Blockbuster Cinema
  • Cinema History 1: beginnings to 1930
  • Cinema History 2: 1930 - 60
  • Cinema History 3: 1960 - 90
  • Cinema History 4: after 1990
  • Cinephilia: Theory and Practice of the Moving Image
  • Cult Cinema
  • Documentary Tradition
  • Film and Media Theory
  • Film Comedy
  • Media Archaeology
  • The Mind Game Film
  • The Moving Image in the Museum
  • New Media Art
  • Queer Film Theory
  • Reality Television
  • Seeing Narrative
  • Sound and Image Theory
  • The Western
  • Topics in World Cinema (Latin America, China, Arab and African)

Year 2​


Writing for Film & Television MFA students must take two required courses:
  • Screenwriting III*
  • Screenwriting IV*

(*Note: Screenwriting III/IV is a year-long course taught by the same instructor.)

Screenwriting concentrates also have priority for the following courses, which are required for those who plan to do television writing for their thesis:
  • Thesis Workshop
  • TV Writing: Pilot

Screenwriters may take Second Year Courses in Directing and Directing Actors, and some Producing courses as electives. Elective courses include:
  • Adaptation
  • Advanced Pilot
  • Business of Television
  • Digital Storytelling I: History and Theory of Interactivity
  • Digital Storytelling II: Building Storyworlds
  • Intro to Cinematography
  • First Features
  • Fundamentals of Editing
  • Playwriting
  • Story Structure
  • Visual Experiences

In preparation of the thesis and Research Arts years. must declare their concentration toward the end of the second year and complete the 60 credits required to graduate. Unlike Creative Producing and Screenwriting & Directing students, Writing for Film & Television students do not participate in the year 2 summer core curriculum D4 short film project.

Year 3​


Year 3 (and beyond) I devoted to thesis work and to special classes contributing to the completion of the thesis, also known as the Research Arts years. There are also several advanced non-credit workshops that are open exclusively to students in their thesis years.

Writing for Film & Television MFA students must take two required courses:
  • Script Revision
  • TV Revision

Screenwriting electives are open to Directing concentrates in the Screenwriting & Directing program. However, priority goes to Writing for Film & Television students and Screenwriting concentrates in the Screenwriting & Directing Program:
  • Advanced Feature Writing
  • Advanced Pilot Writing
  • Advanced Screenplay Revision
  • Pitch Seminar

How to apply​


ALL applicants MUST submit the following in 12-point Courier font:

  1. Autobiographical Essay: Three to four double-spaced pages. Please tell us the story of one or two experiences in your life that affected you strongly and shaped you as a writer. How did these experiences inspire you to become a visual storyteller? Please be sure to use specific details.
  2. Dramatic Writing Sample: Please submit a short sample of your original screenplay or teleplay writing up to ten pages in length. Our preference is that you submit a 'complete' short script that has action and dialogue, more than one character, and a beginning, middle and end. However, you are also welcome to submit up to ten pages from a longer script that you have written as long as you also provide us with a logline and brief synopsis.
  3. Film Prompt:Read the following openings, choose one and imagine the scene that might follow it. The scene you write must include both dialogue and description. It should be no less than two and no more than three pages long. You may change the gender of any character in these prompts, but do not change ages or relationships. Must be in screenplay format.
    1. INT. APARTMENT - NEW YEARS EVE: With a smile plastered firmly into place, the woman begins backing away from the chaotic party down a darkened hallway. Intending to make a hasty exit, she locates her coat on a bed – but is shocked to discover just who is underneath it.
    2. INT. DORM ROOM - LATE NIGHT: The two students sit side by side admiring their handiwork: a pail of water sitting atop the bedroom door, rigged to fall on whoever enters next. They peer at a wall clock and then lean forward, straining to hear any approaching footsteps.
    3. INT. HIGH SCHOOL LOCKER ROOM - DAY: Long after the other students have left for home, one student remains in the locker room, frozen in place, staring into the grimy mirror. Just then, a janitor enters with a mop and pail – startled to find anyone still at school.
  4. Feature Film Treatment: On one double-spaced page for a film you might wish to write, direct or produce based on your application concentration. The treatment must concisely relate a complete dramatic story sufficient to sustain a feature-length film, including major characters and plot developments and a clear statement of the resolution. The story cannot be the same as the one in your dramatic writing sample or your optional video submission. You must state the genre of your treatment and a log line. On a separate page, please state the genre, major characters and a log line for the film. A log line is one or two sentences that describe the protagonist(s) and the story of the film.
  5. Visual Submission (optional): You are welcome to upload a visual sample (10 minutes or less) if you feel it showcases your ability as a writer.

Filmschool.org admitted student perspective​


Filmschool.org member @AlexJoseph says:

"Overall, I had fun with the writing prompts. They want to see your demonstration of your creativity and your own voice, so my advice is to not hold back and have as much fun as you can with your essays and short scripts. You have nothing to lose."

Discover more about their application, including their take on the interview.

Ready to apply?​


The Columbia graduate application for film students opens on October 1, 2023. Click here to start your application before the deadline (see “Columbia University Application Deadlines and What to Expect After Applying”).

How to Apply to Columbia University's Creative Producing MFA Program for 2024 Entry

Columbia University's Creative Producing MFA program helps graduate students master every element of producing for small and feature films. Columbia University is located only a short distance from some of the best film studios nationwide — particularly for independent productions. Faculty include producers in film, television, and digital media; head of creative producing and associate professor Mynette Louie is a Spirit Award-winning, Emmy and Critics Choice-nominated producer (Black Box, Catch the Fair One).

Before you apply, read the year-by-year curriculum breakdown for the Creative Producing MFA program and application requirements taken directly from Columbia University’s website.

Year 1 (fall)​


Film students begin with Columbia’s Core Curriculum. These courses emphasize essential elements of directing, narrative storytelling, and production, and they are taken by students in all graduate degree programs:
  • Directing I
  • Directing Actors I
  • Fundamentals of Directing
  • Elements of Dramatic Narrative
  • Ethics & Inclusive Storytelling
  • Practical Production I
  • Screenwriting I

Year 1 (spring)​

  • Directing II
  • Directing Actors II
  • Practical Production II
  • Role of the Producer
  • Screenwriting II
  • Script to Screen
  • Analysis of Film Language (recommended)

Year 1 (summer)​


Creative Producing MFA students complete an 8-12 minute film production.

History-Theory-Criticism (HTC) Requirement​


All graduate students must take at least one course in Film Studies (generally referred to within the School as “HTC,” an abbreviation for History-Theory-Criticism) within the 60 credits required for the degree. Students planning to apply for teaching assistant positions should take more than one HTC course.

A representative list of HTC courses includes but is not limited to the following. The asterisked courses are specifically recommended for MFA students but any of these courses fulfills the HTC requirement:
  • Analysis of Film Language
  • Cinema History 1: beginnings to 1930
  • Cinema History 2: 1930 - 60
  • Cinema History 3: 1960 - 90
  • Cinema History 4: after 1990
  • Cinephilia: Theory and Practice of the Moving Image
  • Documentary Tradition
  • Film and Media Theory
  • The Moving Image in the Museum
  • Seeing Narrative
  • Sound and Image Theory
  • Topics in American Film (Horror, Comedy, Cult, Western, etc)
  • Topics in World Cinema (Latin America, China, Arab and African)

Year 2​


Creative Producing students must take the following required courses:

The Business of Film
Feature Film Development
Feature Film Financing
Post-Production Supervising
Pre-Production of the Motion Picture
Writing and Script Analysis for Producers

Elective courses include:

The Business of Television
Digital Storytelling I: History and Theory of Interactivity
Digital Storytelling II: Building Storyworlds
Digital Storytelling IV: World-Building
Documentary Producing
Entertainment Law
Film Festivals: Theory & Practice
First Features
Visual Experiences
Writing for the Screen

Year 2 (summer)​


D4 film production – a more ambitious short film, directed by a member of the Directing 4 class. After completion of concentration requirements and 60 credits in the first two years of study, the third year and beyond is devoted to thesis work and to special classes contributing to the completion of the thesis. There are also several advanced non-credit workshops that are open exclusively to students in their thesis years.

Year 3​


Year 3 (and beyond) I devoted to thesis work and to special classes contributing to the completion of the thesis, also known as the Research Arts years. There are also several advanced non-credit workshops that are open exclusively to students in their thesis years.

Creative Producing MFA students must take the following required course:
  • Producing Thesis Advisement
Elective courses include:

Digital Storytelling 3: Immersive Production
How to Start Your Own Production Company
Writing for the Screen – Research Arts

How to Apply​


ALL applicants MUST submit the following in 12-point Courier font:

  1. Autobiographical essay: Four to six double-spaced pages. (Tell us something about yourself and your background, artistic experiences, creative influences, and professional objectives.)
  2. Dramatic Writing Sample: A log line must be included. No more than 10 pages. Must be in screenplay format and must contain dialogue. This can be a complete short screenplay or the first ten pages of a screenplay. It must be original; it may not be an adaptation, except of your own work in another form. Please do not submit writing in prose form and no theater plays. The story cannot be the same as the one in your feature film treatment or your optional video submission.
  3. Film prompt: Read the following openings, choose one and imagine the scene that might follow it. The scene you write must include both dialogue and description. It should be no less than two and no more than three pages long. It should be written in screenplay format. These prompts change every year. The prompts listed below correspond to the Fall 2023 application. You may change the gender of any character in these prompts, but do not change ages or relationships:
    1. INT. APARTMENT - NEW YEARS EVE: With a smile plastered firmly into place, the woman begins backing away from the chaotic party down a darkened hallway. Intending to make a hasty exit, she locates her coat on a bed – but is shocked to discover just who is underneath it.
    2. INT. DORM ROOM - LATE NIGHT: The two students sit side by side admiring their handiwork: a pail of water sitting atop the bedroom door, rigged to fall on whoever enters next. They peer at a wall clock and then lean forward, straining to hear any approaching footsteps.
    3. INT. HIGH SCHOOL LOCKER ROOM - DAY: Long after the other students have left for home, one student remains in the locker room, frozen in place, staring into the grimy mirror. Just then, a janitor enters with a mop and pail – startled to find anyone still at school.
  4. Feature film treatment: On one double-spaced page for a film you might wish to write, direct or produce based on your application concentration(depending upon the concentration you will be applying to). The treatment must concisely relate a complete dramatic story sufficient to sustain a feature-length film, including major characters and plot developments and a clear statement of the resolution. The story cannot be the same as the one in your dramatic writing sample or your optional video submission. You must state the genre of your treatment and a log line. A log line is one or two sentences that describe the protagonist(s) and the story of the film.
  5. Visual Submission (optional). Your visual submission should be uploaded to the Video Upload section of the online application and cannot be linked to a third-party such as YouTube or Vimeo. Submit one of the following:
    1. Film/Video Work: All Film MFA applicants may submit up to 30 minutes of film/video work. It is advisable to put the best work at the beginning of your visual submission.
    2. Visual Exercise: Applicants for Directing who have not shot prior visual material are encouraged to shoot and submit the following OPTIONAL VISUAL EXERCISE: Write and shoot a 2-person SILENT SCENE (no dialogue), between one and two minutes long, which deals with the idea of "COMING TOGETHER." It could be two strangers who make a connection, a fighting couple who then make amends, or two people who 'come together' in anger, physicality or any other dramatic situation you choose. You may use subjects of any genders or ages, and any locations and props, etc. that you have available to you. Elaborate production expense is NOT the goal of this part of the application. You may shoot in any format.
  6. Resume: Creative Producing applicants must summarize their professional and academic achievements in an easy-to-read resume.

Filmschool.org admitted student perspective​


Filmschool.org member @thep2k2 says:

"Columbia was my strongest application and my favorite from the start. My two page script was based off of a conversation I had had at my Uncle’s wedding and the first ten pages of screenplay were based on a Western I wrote with my screenwriting friend from Chapman."

Learn more about their academic background.

Ready to apply?​


The Columbia graduate application for film students opens on October 1, 2023. Click here to start your application before the deadline (see “Columbia University Application Deadlines and What to Expect After Applying”).

How to Apply to Columbia University as an International Applicant

Columbia University School of the Arts is highly diverse: In Fall 2022, international students from 53 countries comprised 31 percent of the student body. Before you apply, read this addendum about funding from the School of the Arts Admissions Office:
  1. Funding for international students is limited. International applicants must have a plan for funding for the duration of their intended degree programs, including miscellaneous expenses and the cost of living. Proof of funding is required for attendance. Institutional scholarships are available, but do not replace the personal funding plan requirement.
  2. Monthly tuition payment plans are available to offset the cost of attendance. Find out how to enroll.
  3. To maintain full-time enrollment and retain the student visa, international students must not exceed an outstanding student account balance of $999.

How to apply


Columbia University uses the same holistic admissions process for international applicants. Admissions officers review applications by region and . Columbia College and the School of the Arts each have unique admissions criteria for international students:

Undergraduate applicants


International undergraduate applicants share the general admissions requirement and creative materials requirement with domestic students. Prepare to submit the following supplemental materials:
  • Proof of English language proficiency —Undergraduate international applicants must show mastery of English with one of the following:
    • Your home language is English.
    • Your primary language of instruction at school has been English for the duration of your secondary school career.
    • You earned one or more of the following subsection scores on the SAT or ACT:
      • 700 or higher on the Evidence Based Reading and Writing section of the SAT (either paper or digital administration)
      • 29 or higher on the English or Reading sections of the ACT

If you do not meet the English language proficiency requirements, you must take one of the following tests (plus minimum required scores):
  • TOEFL (iBT only): 105
  • IELTS: 7.5
  • Duolingo English Test (DET): 135
  • Cambridge English (C1 Advanced, C2 Proficiency): 191

Click here to review the guidelines for international undergraduate applicants.

Graduate applicants


International graduate applicants share the general admissions requirement and creative materials requirement with domestic students. Prepare to submit the following supplemental materials:
  • Unofficial transcripts from all institutions of higher education (must be translated into English).
  • Proof of English proficiency — English language proficiency test scores must be sent to Columbia University School of the Arts Graduate Admission and meet the minimum required scores:
    • TOEFL: 100 (Internet-based) or 600 (paper-based)
    • IELTS: 7.5
    • Duolingo: 120
      • Alternatively, applicants can send proof of a bachelor's degree from an institution with English as its main language of instruction.
Applicants who are attending or have attended Chinese institutions of higher education must contact CHESICC to request the submission of a Verification Report of China Higher Education Student’s Academic Transcript and a Verification Report of China Higher Education Qualification Certificate. These reports must be submitted to soaadmissions@columbia.edu in advance of the application deadline.

International applicants from other regions who cannot supply digital copies of their transcripts must contact the World Education Services (WES) and order a Course-by-Course Evaluation and International Credential Advantage Package. These documents must be sent to soaadmissions@columbia.edu in advance of the application deadline.

If accepted, international graduate applicants must also obtain an F1 or comparable student visa. Columbia University supplies guidelines to obtain the student visa; students from certain regions may have limited work-study opportunities.

Click here to review the application guidelines for international graduate applicants.

Note: U.S. citizens and eligible non-U.S. residents studying in another country at the time of the application are not considered international students.

Columbia University Application Deadlines (2024) and What to Expect After Applying

Considering applying to Columbia College or the School of the Arts? Review the application deadlines, plus admissions decision notification milestones based on data according to Acceptance Statistics from our Application Database.

Undergraduate application deadlines and admissions timeline​


BA in Film and Media Studies*

Early Decision

  • Early Decision Application Deadline: November 1 at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • QuestBridge National College Match applicants: November 1 at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • Early Decision (Financial Aid Applications): November 15 at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • Early Decision Admissions and Financial Aid Notifications: Mid-December, 2023
  • Early Decision Response Deadline: Early January, 2023
Regular Decision
  • Regular Decision Application Deadline: January 1 at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • Regular Decision Financial Aid Applications: February 15 at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • Regular Decision Admissions and Financial Aid Notifications: Early April, 2024
  • Regular Decisions Response Deadline: May 1 at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • Enrollment Deferral Request Deadline: May 15 at 11:59 p.m. ET
Exclusive FilmSchool.org Data calculated from our database:
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Notification Date: Not Reported
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Date: Not Reported
  • Earliest/Latest Decision Notification Date: Not Reported
  • Earliest/Latest Admitted Off Waitlist Date: Not Reported
  • Earliest/Latest Scholarship Notification: Not Reported
*Note: Not enough FilmSchool.org members have logged their applications to provide our overview of the admissions timeline. Click here to log your application and improve our database.

Graduate application deadlines and admissions timeline​


Writing for Film and Television MFA
  • Application Deadline: December 19, 2023 at 11:59 p.m. ET
Exclusive FilmSchool.org Data calculated from our database:
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Notification Date: February 3 - 6
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Date: February 15 - February 27
  • Earliest/Latest Decision Notification Date: March 23 - March 23
  • Earliest/Latest Admitted Off Waitlist Date: June 16 - June 16
  • Earliest/Latest Scholarship Notification: June 16 - June 16
Screenwriting and Directing MFA
  • Application Deadline: December 19, 2023 at 11:59 p.m. ET
Exclusive FilmSchool.org Data calculated from our database:
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Notification Date: February 5 - April 23
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Date: February 9 - June 1
  • Earliest/Latest Decision Notification Date: February 5 - April 7
  • Earliest/Latest Admitted Off Waitlist Date: Not Reported
  • Earliest/Latest Scholarship Notification:March 20 - March 21

Creative Producing MFA​

  • Application Deadline: December 19, 2023 at 11:59 p.m. ET
Exclusive FilmSchool.org Data calculated from our database:
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Notification Date: January 16 - February 10
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Date: February 1 - March 17
  • Earliest/Latest Decision Notification Date: March 5 - March 26
  • Earliest/Latest Admitted Off Waitlist Date: Not Reported
  • Earliest/Latest Scholarship Notification: March 10 - March 10

What to expect after applying to Columbia University​


Columbia University sends official admissions decisions (accepted, waitlisted, rejected) for both undergraduate and graduate applicants via email, and occasionally by mail. Decision notifications are not sent during March and April. Columbia University does not offer critiques of application materials or feedback around admissions decisions. Interviews for BA in Film and Media studies program applicants are not guaranteed nor required for admission. If selected, you will meet with a member of Columbia’s Alumni Representative Committee.

To update your email address and/or mailing address, email soaadmissions@columbia.edu with "Applicant Address Update" in the subject line.

If accepted, you must submit a non-refundable $800 deposit by check, credit card, or money order to Columbia University by the deadline in their admissions decision letters. The deposit requires your program name, concentration, and CU student ID. If the deposit is not postmarked or digitally submitted before or on the due date, your admissions offer is null; extensions are granted on case-by-case basis.

Does Columbia University grant deferrals?​


The University grants deferrals of admission only in special circumstances. If granted, the non-refundable $800 deposit will hold your spot until February 1, 2025. Financial aid and scholarships do not carry over to the following academic year, and re-enrollment requires an additional non-refundable $400 deposit.

Does Columbia University have a waitlist?​


Yes, but the University does not provide waitlist statistics. Waitlisted students will receive notifications as soon as spots become available; most waitlisted candidates will receive an admissions decision by August 2024. The waitlist does not carry over to the following admissions season.

Access Columbia's acceptance statistics and admitted applicant demographics​


Columbia University consistently ranks among the top East Coast and U.S. film schools. To see how you measure up against other film school applicants, get a head start by becoming a Supporting Member.

As a Supporting Member, you gain access to:
  • Data about the Columbia University waitlist
  • The average Columbia University financial aid award
  • Applications from admitted Columbia University students
  • Admissions statistics for Columbia University's BA/MFA programs
Filmschool.org also offers dozens of Columbia University applications from admitted, waitlisted, and rejected applicants. Upgrade your membership today to enjoy full access to our exclusive data.

Increase Your Chances of Acceptance to Columbia University

Columbia University is ideal for filmmakers with a desire for a hands-on, collaborative learning experience in one of the most desirable cities for independent filmmakers and creators who aspire to take over film sets in Hollywood. Give yourself a competitive edge by becoming a Supporting Member to receive unlimited access to 4,000+ applications in the Application Database, plus exclusive interviews with top film school admissions departments, filmmakers, and film students.

Filmschool.org's free forums can also help you apply to Columbia University. If you need advice about creating your application, post in the Application Questions forum or The Waiting Game forum. Visit the Application Year Threads (MA/MFA or BA/BS) forum to see past year's Columbia University threads and/or start or reply to a new one to connect with other aspiring film students.

Browse Filmschool.org's archive of past Columbia University applications in our Application Database. For additional information, contact:

Support other film students by logging your Columbia University application with Filmschool.org


Once you apply, log your application in our Application Database to help the site with our acceptance data for the program. Logging your application helps our members see actual notification dates, accepted GPAs, test scores, and other important data. Your contributions are a great help to fellow (and future) Columbia applicants.

Are you currently attending Columbia University or have you graduated from one of their film programs? Tell prospective film students about your experience in the comments section.

At Filmschool.org, we aim to help you choose the best film school for you, simplify the application process, and navigate getting scholarships and financial aid. By learning about what your life will look like during and after film school, you can apply to your programs of choice and enter the industry with confidence. Supporting Memberships allow us to carry out our mission without undue influence from these film schools and keep our content as unbiased as possible.
About author
Alexa P.
Alexa Pellegrini (she/her) is a freelance copywriter, editor, poet, and essayist. Keep up with her latest musings on Twitter.

Comments

There are no comments to display.

More in Applying to Film School

More from Alexa Pellegrini


Latest Accepted Applications


Acceptance Data
For up to date Film School Acceptance Rates, including Minimum GPAs, Minimum Test Scores, After Interview and Off-Waitlist Acceptance Rates, Film Experience and Undergraduate degrees of accepted applicants, Age data, and other acceptance statistics for your film program of choice simply navigate to the Acceptance Rates tab on each film school's page in our Film School Database.

For example:
Log your own Application with our application database to help improve the site's acceptance data.

Article information

Author
Alexa Pellegrini
Article read time
36 min read
Views
11,089
Last update

Latest Applications

Applications
Articles
Forums
Film Schools
Scholarships
Back
Top