Loyola Marymount University: How to Apply for 2024, Acceptance Rate, and What To Expect as an LMU SFTV Film Student

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Loyola Marymount University School of Film and Television (LMU SFTV) has solidified itself as one of the nation’s best film schools. In 2023, The Hollywood Reporter ranked LMU SFTV no. 8 in its annual list of the best American film schools, solidifying its place in the top 10 for more than a decade. And in 2022, FilmSchool.org named LMU SFTV runner-up for Best Producing Program and one of the best undergraduate programs in America.

LMU SFTV emphasizes teamwork and attracts aspirational filmmakers from all walks of life. The film program offers a solid 12:1 student-to-faculty ratio and top-notch facilities that help film students tell progressive stories that inspire, educate, and unite audiences.

70% of undergraduate film students complete a film industry internship at LMU SFTV. An average of 83% of students in each undergraduate class finds industry jobs within six months of graduation.

The application for 2024 is now open. Before you apply, review the admissions timeline; deadlines start in early November (see "LMU SFTV Application Deadlines (2024) and What to Expect After Applying").

What is life like at LMU SFTV?

The University is located in West Los Angeles’ Silicon Beach, between Playa Vista and Westchester. Playa Del Rey Beach is a 45-minute walk while Santa Monica is a 35-minute bus ride. On-campus facilities and dorms are surrounded by stunning views of the Pacific Ocean, and film students enjoy access to industry-standard film equipment (see "LMU SFTV State-of-the-Art Film Equipment and Technology").

The film program has five key learning outcomes for undergraduate and graduates:
  1. Film History and Context — Learn the historical and sociocultural foundations of American and global film, television, and new media.
  2. Storytelling — Become highly adept in all methods of visual storytelling, such as screenwriting, camera placement, lighting, blocking, performance, and post-production methodologies.
  3. Technical Proficiency — Develop expertise in the specialization of your choice.
  4. Voice and Creativity — Develop creative work that builds on the film industry canon and reflects your unique voice as a filmmaker.
  5. Collaboration — Network and expand your skill set by engaging in group exercises and/or thesis projects.
The Westchester and Playa Vista campuses offer 24/7 access to cutting-edge filmmaking facilities. LMU SFTV students use editing and advanced color correction suites outfitted with iMac Pros, reference monitors, 4K TVs, and Tangent Element Coloring Surfaces, and other equipment. Tapeless workflow stores films in LMU SFTV’s central server; projects are accessible in any location. Film students can also shoot on 35mm and screen their films at the Mayer Theater, a 126-seat venue at the Westchester campus.

The University is not only centrally located to Hollywood, but also connects students to key industry players by hosting events at world-renowned film festivals. In 2023, LMU SFTV hosted the Sundance Film Festival panel "What's Next?" to examine the future of the industry; 10 students attended.

LMU SFTV also emphasizes community and equity: Industry Women+ was created to help develop a more inclusive and equitable film industry. Female and gender non-binary film students have a safe space to participate in round-table discussions, attend Q&A sessions with industry experts, and undertake screenwriting mentorships.

For an inside look at studying at LMU SFTV and life after graduation, read FilmSchool.org’s interviews with MFA graduate Ashley Seering (@A248) and MFA graduate Adriano Mirchou (@andy001).

Notable LMU SFTV alumni​


LMU SFTV is known for producing Hollywood heavy hitters who develop box office hits and impactful independent features.

Christian Buenaventura (G’05, Recording Arts) worked as a dialogue editor on HBO’s True Blood and FX’s American Horror Story. Buenaventura won Best Sound Editing for a Miniseries, Movie, or a Special for American Horror Story: Asylum (“Welcome to Briarcliff”). Buenaventura also received nominations for Outstanding Sound Editing in a Movie or Special for American Horror Story: Double Feature (“Gaslight”) and True Blood season 3 (“Hitting the Ground”).

Patricia Whitcher (G’83, Directing and Producing for Film and Television) was the executive producer for Marvel films such as Thor, The Avengers, and Captain Marvel. Whitcher also served as a unit production manager on Thor, Avengers: Age of Ultron, and Spider-man: Homecoming.

Shay Hatten (BFA’16, Screenwriting) is best known for writing John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum, Army of the Dead, and Army of Thieves. At only 23 years old, Hatten scored a deal to write the fifth film in the John Wick franchise, Ballerina, starring Ana de Armas.

10 commonly asked questions about LMU SFTV


1. Is it difficult to get accepted to LMU SFTV?


According to EducationScientists, the undergraduate film program has an acceptance rate of 19% — highly competitive, but slightly higher than the nation’s other top 10 film schools. The graduate film program’s acceptance rate hovers around 6%, on average.

FilmSchool.org members have enjoyed higher acceptance rates to LMU SFTV – as high as 56% for its popular Film and Television Production MFA program. Supporting Members have full access to all of our acceptance statistics and more.

2. Is LMU SFTV test optional?

Yes – in most cases. The GRE is required for graduate applicants who do not meet the required GPA minimum (3.0). For undergraduate applicants, SAT/ACT scores are optional. FilmSchool.org’s Application Database allows FilmSchool.org members to see the test scores of admitted LMU SFTV applicants.

3. Does LMU SFTV's film program require an interview?


Interviews are not required for undergraduate applicants, but the Office of Admission encourages undergraduate applicants to schedule individual admission counseling appointments. To make an appointment, visit http://admission.lmu.edu, call 310.338.2750, or email admissions@lmu.edu.

Graduate applicants are required to sit for virtual interviews.

FilmSchool.org's Application Database contains interview questions and other insights from other LMU SFTV applicants. It also includes comprehensive Admissions Statistics for each film degree:
4. What is the average GPA of an LMU student?

According to PrepScholar.com, the average LMU student has a highly competitive GPA of 3.81.

FilmSchool.org’s Application Database allows FilmSchool.org members to see the accepted GPAs of admitted LMU SFTV applicants; their GPAs are sometimes much lower. Additionally, our Admissions Statistics pages have more statistics of accepted applicants including lowest GPA.

5. What is the average size of LMU SFTV’s graduate film class?


Around 15 students.

6. Does LMU SFTV offer study abroad programs?


Film students can learn how to tell more diverse, globally-informed stories at various locations abroad. Here are a few past study abroad programs:
  • Italy — SFTV Summer semester in Bologna
  • Australia — Swinburne University of Technology (Production)
  • Canada — Champlain College in Montreal (Animation; Game Design; Internship)
  • Germany — LMU Film Production in Bonn
  • Germany — LMU International Documentary minor in Bonn
  • Hungary — LMU Screenwriting in Budapest
  • Ireland — University College Cork (Film Studies)
Click here for an overview of LMU’s study abroad programs for film students.

7. Can graduate applicants apply to multiple programs?​


Graduate applicants can apply to a maximum of one program per year.

8. How much does the graduate thesis film cost?​


Thesis film costs depend on length, location, talent, additional equipment, and other factors. To offset these costs, LMU SFTV supplies:
  • A wide assortment of cameras, lighting, and grip equipment
  • Post-production suites including editing bays, color-correction stations, sound mixing facilities, and ADR/Foley studios
  • Access to use LMU's Westchester and Playa Vista campuses as filming locations
LMU SFTV students are responsible for the following expenses:
  • Meals for cast and crew during shoot days
  • A small fee for permits
  • Transportation needed during shoot days (e.g. truck rental)
  • Special props, set items, and costumes
  • Special cameras or production equipment that differs from LMU's existing equipment inventory
Alumni have made thesis films for as little as $1,000. LMU SFTV recommends students stick to a lower-cost film budget in preparation for developing or managing strict film budgets as industry players.

9. What are the differences between Writing for the Screen and Writing and Producing for TV?​


Writing for the Screen prepares film students to write features and documentaries. Writing and Producing for TV prepares film students to become showrunners (writer-directors and writer-producers). For guidance on which writing program to choose at the graduate level, email sftvgradprograms@lmu.edu.

10. Can LMU SFTV students take internships?​


Yes. The Career and Professional Development office connects undergraduates and graduates to film industry internships via HandShake. Internships can be completed throughout year 2 and during the summer semester. Film students are responsible for networking, applying, and attending interviews using resources provided by LMU SFTV.

Due to the rigorous curriculum, the Office of Admission urges graduate film students to wait until after year 1 to apply for internships.

LMU SFTV information sessions and tours


Prospective film students can participate in Zoom information sessions to discuss life at LMU, financial aid, and more with LMU alumni and faculty at these panels:


In-person campus tours occur year round and must be scheduled in advance. VIrtual tours occur once per week.

Editor's note: This article has been updated to reflect 2024 application instructions. The film program is now open to undergraduate applicants and graduate applicants.

Continue reading...​

Loyola Marymount University SFTV Acceptance Rate

LMU SFTV accepts around 20% of undergraduate applicants and fewer than 10% of graduate applicants per cycle. However, FilmSchool.org members have reported much higher acceptance rates.

FilmSchool.org's Application Database calculates actual LMU SFTV acceptance rates and tabulate additional data such as accepted applicant demographics, prior filmmaking experience, lowest accepted GPAs, test scores, and more. See the links below for our full acceptance statistics for each program.

When you apply, be sure to log your own application with our database so that we can improve this data.

LMU SFTV's State-of-the-Art Film Equipment and Technology

Take a look at LMU SFTV’s impressive selection of film equipment and technology broken down by department:

Camera Department


Digital Motion Picture Cameras
  • Arri Alexa Mini
  • RED One MX
  • Canon C300 MKI
  • Canon C100 MKII
  • Canon XF100

Film Motion Picture Cameras
  • Arri BL4s Super35
  • Arri SR2 Super16

Cinema Prime Lens Sets
  • Zeiss Ultra Primes
  • Zeiss Super Speeds
  • Zeiss CP2
  • Elite Super Speeds
  • Canon Cinema Primes

Cinema Zoom Lenses
  • Cooke 20-100mm
  • Angenieux EZ 15-40mm & 30-90mm
  • Canon 30-105mm
  • Zeiss 12-120mm

Lighting and Grip


LED Lighting
  • Arri Skypanels
  • Arri Interview Kits
  • Kino Flo Celeb
  • Kino Flo Diva - RGB
  • Mole Richardson - 1x1
  • Mole Richardson - Tungsten Balanced Fresnel Tweenie, Baby, Junior and Studio
  • Mole Richardson - Tungsten Balanced Softlight
  • Source 4

HMI Lighting
  • Joker Bug - 400W and 800W
  • 1.8 HMIs - Sunray
  • 1.2 HMIs - Arri and Mole Richardson
  • Digimole - 200W and 400W

Fresnel / Open-Faced / Fluorescent Lighting
  • Mole Richardson - Fresnels 650W - 20K
  • Mole Richardson - Open-Face/Par 750W - Maxibrute
  • Kino Flo - Diva
  • Kino Flo - 2Bank, 4Bank
  • Kino Flo Image - 45, 80 and 85
  • Source 4
  • Parcan
  • Coops
  • Space lights

Grip Support
  • Doorway Dollies
  • Western/Desert Dolly
  • Matthews 4ft Slider
  • Matthews Dutti Dolly
  • Dana dolly
  • Matthews Centipede Wheels
  • Traditional Stands, Hardware, Flags and more

Sound Equipment


Mixer/Recorders
  • Sound Devices 688
  • SoundDevices 644
  • Sound Devices MixPre3

Microphones
  • Schoeps CMIT-5U
  • Sennheiser MKH 50
  • Sennheiser 416

RF Kits
  • Lectrosonics L series
  • Wisycom ENG Kits

Timecode
  • Ambient Systems
  • Tentacle Sync E

Walter and Grace Lantz Animation Lab


As one of the first animation labs in the world to have virtual cinematography, LMU SFTV film students have access to:
  • 4,000+ square foot premiere studio designed by Gensler
  • Render farm—30 nodes rendering animation frames
  • Motion capture/stop motion stage with Natural Point OptiTrack system and LED lighting instruments

Editing Labs


LMU SFTV has two campuses equipped with editing labs that help film students transform footage or rough cuts into compelling, polished films:


Westchester Campus
  • Editing Computer Lab with 16 iMacs and 4K Side Monitors
  • Sound Editing Computer Lab with 18 Base Model iMacs
  • Multi-Purpose Computer Lab with 16 Base Model iMacs and a central conference table
  • Four editing suites with iMac Pros, Reference Monitors, 4K TVs, and Black Magic Micro-panel Coloring Surfaces
  • Four editing suites with iMac Pro, Reference Monitors, 4K TVs, and Tangent Element Coloring Surfaces
  • One advanced edit suite with iMac Pro, Reference Monitor, 4K TV, and Tangent Element Coloring Surface. Advanced Color Correction Suite

Playa Vista Campus
  • Editing Classroom / Computer Lab with 12 iMacs and 4K Side Monitors, 5.1 surround sound
  • Sound Editing Classroom / Computer Lab with 18 iMacs; teacher’s station has Avid S6 and attached Foley / ADR room; theater-quality 7.1 Surround Sound
  • Eight editing suites with iMac Pros with dual-screen setup, HP Z31 Dream Display reference monitors, and BlackMagic Micro Color Control Surfaces
  • Mix Stage (seats 12) with Mac Pro, Avid S6 Mix Console, Projector and theater-quality 7.1 surround sound
  • Foley / ADR Stage with Mac Pro, Avid C|24 Mix Console, 5.1 surround sound, four microphone inputs, four headphone outputs, Sennheiser MKH 416 and Neumann TLM-102 in each stage, multiple walking surfaces and props.
  • Color Correction Suite with iMac Pro, Advanced HP Z31 Dream Display reference monitor, Christie 2K projector, and Tangent Element Coloring Surface

LMU SFTV Application Deadlines (2024) and What to Expect After Applying

Prepare to apply to LMU SFTV by marking your calendar with these deadlines. Take a look at our breakdown of the admissions timeline including data from FilmSchool.org members' applications.

Undergraduate application deadlines and admissions timeline​

  • Early Decision I Application Deadline: November 1, 2023 at 11:59 p.m. PST
    • Financial Aid Application Deadline: November 15, 2023 at 11:59 p.m. PST
  • Early Action Application Deadline: November 1, 2023 at 11:59 p.m. PST
    • Financial Aid Application Deadline: January 15, 2024 at 11:59 p.m. PST
  • Early Decision II Application Deadline: January 8, 2024 at 11:59 p.m. PST
    • Financial Aid Application Deadline: January 15, 2024 at 11:59 p.m. PST
  • Regular Decision Application Deadline:: January 15, 2024 at 11:59 p.m. PST
    • Financial Aid Application Deadline: February 1, 2024 at 11:59 p.m. PST
  • Regular Decision (transfer) Application Deadline: Rolling
    • Financial Aid Application Deadline: February 1, 2024 at 11:59 p.m. PST
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Notification Date:Not Reported
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Date: N/A
  • Earliest/Latest Decision Notification Date: February 25 - December 17
  • Earliest/Latest Admitted Off Waitlist Date:Not Reported

Graduate application deadlines and admissions timeline​


Film and Television Production
  • Application Deadline: November 15, 2023 at 11:59 p.m. PST
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Notification Date: January 11 - March 11
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Date: January 4 - February 25
  • Earliest/Latest Decision Notification Date: March 1 - April 20
  • Earliest/Latest Admitted Off Waitlist Date: Not Reported

Writing and Producing for Television
  • Application Deadline: November 15, 2023 at 11:59 p.m. PST
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Notification Date: January 12 - February 21
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Date: January 30 - February 28
  • Earliest/Latest Decision Notification Date: March 2 - April 25
  • Earliest/Latest Admitted Off Waitlist Date: April 26 - April 27

Writing for the Screen
  • Application Deadline: November 15, 2023 at 11:59 p.m. PST
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Notification Date: January 6 - February 10
  • Earliest/Latest Interview Date: January 4 - February 25
  • Earliest/Latest Decision Notification Date: March 1 - April 20
  • Earliest/Latest Admitted Off Waitlist Date: Not Reported
  • Earliest Admitted Off Waitlist Date: Not Reported

What to expect after applying to LMU SFTV​


Applications are reviewed on a continuous basis. The Office of Admission only reviews applications that have all the required creative materials and supporting documents. Most applicants receive their admissions decisions 2-4 weeks after the deadline.

Admissions decisions are posted on the application portal and sent via email.

LMU SFTV Cost of Attendance, Financial Aid, and Scholarships

As a private film school in Los Angeles, LMU SFTV comes with a hefty price tag. However, the University offers excellent financial aid packages, plus Graduate Assistantships and fellowships to offset the cost of attendance. Before you apply, find out the cost of attendance per academic year for undergraduates and graduates.

Cost of undergraduate attendance (Fall 2023-Spring 2024)


Academics
  • Tuition: $57,602
  • Books and Supplies: $1,152
  • Tuition Deposit: $500
  • New Student Fee: $485
    • New International Student Fee: $1,150
    • Spring Entry New Student Fee: $238
  • Loan Fees: $71
  • Registration Fee: $130
  • Student Activity Fee: $288
  • Accident Insurance: $114.00*
  • Health Insurance: $2,650*
  • Parking Fee: $918
  • Media Fee: $140.00
  • Student Recreation Facility Fee: $215

Cost of Living
  • Room and Board:
    • On-campus: $17,252
    • Off-campus: $17,784
    • Commuting: $9,360
  • Personal and Misc. Costs
    • On-campus: $2,700
    • Off-campus: $3,924
    • Commuting: $3,348
Total cost of attendance for on-campus students: $84,217
Total cost of attendance for off-campus students: $85,973
Total cost of attendance for commuters: $76,973

LMU urges students to prepare for fluctuations to these estimates, particularly around meal plans, parking and transportation, and personal and miscellaneous expenses. These estimates also determine the maximum loan amount students can borrow per year.

*Note: The Accident Insurance fee and Health Insurance are required for all undergraduates enrolled in 7 or more credits per semester.

Undergraduate financial aid eligibility requirements​


All students are automatically considered for merit scholarships as part of the admission process; no separate application is required for merit scholarships. To be considered for need-based financial aid, complete the following steps:

1. Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) for 2023-2024: Use LMU's Federal School Code (001234). In order to electronically sign your FAFSA, you will need an FSA ID. Create an FSA ID. To ensure that you receive timely notification of your LMU financial aid award, complete your FAFSA by the priority deadline (see "

The FAFSA can be filed at any time up until February 1, 2024.

2. Complete the Cal Grant GPA Verification Form: For California residents only, the Cal Grant is awarded annually for applicants who qualify. First-year applicants must:
  • Submit the 2023-2024 Cal Grant GPA Verification Form by the March 2, 2023 deadline. Most California high schools are required to automatically submit the GPA Verification form for their students, but it is your responsibility to confirm the GPA Verification filing process at your school.
    • If your school does notautomatically submit the GPA Verification Form, please follow these steps:
      • Download the 2023-2024 Cal Grant GPA Verification Form from the California Student Aid Commission (CSAC) website. Fill out the student portion of the form and sign it. Ask the registrar at the school you currently attend or most recently attended to complete the form.
      • Make a copy for your records and mail the original to the California Student Aid Commission (CSAC).
  • Completing the FAFSA by March 2, 2024 to meet the Cal Grant eligibility deadline.

Financial aid for undergraduate transfers​


Financial aid for transfer students requires a few extra steps:
  • If you were enrolled at a California Community College, submit your Community College Cal Grant GPA Verification Form to California Student Aid Commission (CSAC) by the deadline.
  • Complete the Transfer Entitlement Certification Form (G-6) and submit it to CSAC by March 2, 2023. (Check CSAC's website for availability.)
  • Submit an Official Copy of your High School Transcripts to LMU Admission.
  • If any additional information or documentation is required to complete your financial aid application, LMU Financial Aid will notify you or your parent(s) via PROWL.
  • Submission of all requested documents and forms within 10 days of them being requested via PROWL will ensure faster application processing.
LMU Financial Aid uses the email address on the official application and/or FAFSA application for financial aid updates. For more information about LMU tuition and fees for transfers, email finaid@lmu.edu or call the Office of Financial Aid at 310-338-2753.

Cost of graduate attendance (Fall 2023-Spring 2024)


Academics
  • Tuition (Year 1)
    • Film and Television Production: $36,864
    • Writing and Producing for Television: $27,648
    • Writing for the Screen: $27,648
  • Tuition (Year 2)
    • Film and Television Production: $27,648
    • Writing and Producing for Television: $27,648
    • Writing for the Screen: $27,648
  • Tuition (Year 3)
    • Film and Television Production: $27,648
    • Writing and Producing for Television: $23,040
    • Writing for the Screen: $23,040
  • Fees
    • Registration Fee: $130
    • Graduate Student Activity Fee: $50
    • International Student Fee: $120
    • Accident Insurance (mandatory for all students enrolled in 7 or more units): $117
    • Student Health Insurance (mandatory for all students enrolled in 7 or more units): $2,467
    • Parking Fee: $750
Cost of Living

Total cost of attendance for Film and Television Production: $92,160; $115,369.85 for one year at The Graduate House (single occupancy)
Total cost of attendance for Writing for the Screen, Writing and Producing for Television: $78,336; $101,572.85 for one year at The Graduate House (single occupancy)

*Note: If you enroll in 7 or more units per semester, you are automatically billed for Student Health Insurance and Parking Permits. Request waivers at the following links:
  • Student Health Insurance ($7,401 for 3 years)
  • Parking ($3,000 for 3 years) - Login to MyLMU and select LMU Park from "System Logins" in the top navigation menu.

Graduate financial aid eligibility requirements​


Loyola Marymount University offers graduate students financial aid through Federal Direct loans, work-study, teaching assistantships, departmental grants, and scholarships. To qualify for financial aid, you must be enrolled at least half-time in graduate-level courses.

To apply for financial aid, submit the following materials:

1. Complete and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) for the 2023-2024 year: LMU's Federal School Code is 001234. Please ensure that you are completing the FAFSA for the correct aid year - multiple FAFSA aid years will be available, but Fall 2022 entering students must file the 2022-2023 FAFSA to be eligible for aid in Fall 2022. In order to electronically sign your form, you will need an FSA ID.

2. Complete your department's scholarship application: All students wishing to apply for institutional grants and scholarships must complete their departments' scholarship application. The application should be submitted directly to your college by the deadline indicated on the application.

3. Check your student email within MyLMU regularly for updates: If any additional information or documentation is required to complete your financial aid application, LMU Financial Aid will notify you via your LION email. Submit all requested documents quickly to avoid any delay in awarding and/or loss of aid eligibility.

Additional funding for graduate film students​


Loyola Marymount University encourages graduate students who need external financial support to use the Federal Direct Student Loan Program through the U.S. Department of Education. You can also try these options:

Graduate Assistantships

Each year, SFTV offers a limited number of Graduate Assistantships. Student Employment Services posts open positions, as well as workshops and other professional development resources.

Federal Work-Study

Federal Work-Study (FWS) offered a maximum of $3,200 per year in 2022. Roles on-campus are not guaranteed, but may be listed on the SES portal.

If you choose to work on campus, LMU mandates you follow these requirements:
  • Notify the Financial Aid Office of enrollment changes that may affect your eligibility for a work award.
  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress.
  • Keep track of your hours so that you do not earn more than your work award. Your employer will be responsible for 100% of any wages earned in excess of your work award.
  • Notify your supervisor of changes to your work award.
  • Report ready to work at the scheduled time.
  • Dress appropriately for the workplace.
  • Complete duties and not conduct personal business while at work.
  • Work with a cooperative and positive attitude.
  • Notify the supervisor as soon as possible of any changes in the work schedule and of projects and exams which may interfere with the work schedule.
  • Submit the completed time-card/time-sheet and/or complete and submit electronic time-sheet to supervisor on time.
  • Adhere to any confidentiality/security agreements set forth by the employer.
  • Notify each supervisor if employed in more than one position on campus.
  • Notify the supervisor of any job-related accident.

LMU Work

LMU Work provides an LMU-funded award of up to $2,000 per year to graduate film students who complete the FAFSA and do not qualify for FWS.

Apply for the Academy Nicholl Fellowship in Screenwriting


LMU SFTV students with a passion for screenwriting can obtain more funding by applying for the Academy Nicholl Fellowship in Screenwriting. Each year, five winners receive $35,000. The fellowship is open to amateur screenwriters 18 and older.

To apply, submit a feature length screenplay and $48 entry fee (discounted for full-time LMU SFTV students) before the deadline. Winners participate in award ceremonies and seminars, in addition to receiving one Academy member mentorship and writing one feature-length screenplay.

How to Apply to LMU SFTV's B.A. Film Programs for 2024 Entry

LMU SFTV offers some of the best undergraduate film programs in America. The University takes a holistic approach to filmmaking that encourages collaboration, unity, and diverse thinking over intense competition. Living on campus is not required, but highly encouraged.

LMU SFTV undergraduate applicants can apply through Coalition, LMU Online, or the Common Application. The Office of Admission recommends high schoolers prepare for LMU by taking these courses:
  • English: 4 years
  • Foreign Language: 3 years
  • Mathematics: 3 years
  • Laboratory Science: 2 years
  • Social Sciences: 3 years
  • Academic Electives: 1 year

How to apply

  1. Online Application: In addition to the $60 application fee (non-refundable). To request a fee waiver, please follow the instructions on your application.
  2. Letters of Recommendation: Supply a minimum of one and no more than two letters of recommendation. LMU SFTV advises undergraduates to provide one letter from a teacher and an optional second letter from a guidance counselor or principal.
  3. Final Transcripts: Upload your official high school transcripts with your anticipated graduation date. Include your current grades from the date of your application. (Transfer students must provide transcripts from each post-secondary school they attended.)
  4. Creative Portfolio List: The portfolio list is a written record of your film and digital media creations. Each entry must include the title and a logline (if appropriate), the year of completion, and your creative role in its production. The Portfolio List should should explain the range and depth of your creative experiences. Formal recognition, such as awards, publications, jobs and exhibitions, should be noted. The name of the institution or publication should be included when listing creative materials prepared for a class or publication. Please do not submit any of these materials to us — submit only a list of your work as a .PDF file. An example of the Portfolio List:
    • July 2020, A Day in the Life, digital video, 12 minutes. Creative role: Writer/director. A documentary on a homeless Iraq vet who has lived on the streets since his return from the military. Created for senior-year multimedia project, East Lansing High School, East Lansing, MI.
    • March 2019, Doorways, a series of five black-and-white photographs. Creative role: Photographer. "Second Prize Winner" in the Des Moines Sunday Journal photo contest.
  5. Visual Sample: Provide a visual sample of one film or video work in which you performed a primary creative role (3 minutes maximum). The work may be fictional or documentary, live-action or animated. We are most interested in the stories you tell, and less concerned with your technical skills at this point. SFTV considers applicants with a unique voice and vision, storytellers who are in the early stages of their filmmaking careers, as well as more experienced applicants.


Applicants can only submit creative materials after completing the general online application. Regular Decision applicants should submit their creative materials no later than January 15, 2024. Transfer applicants should submit their portfolios no later than February 1, 2024, or as soon as the Applicant Status page instructions arrive.

ACT/SAT scores are optional. Providing standardized test scores will not give you an automatic competitive advantage, but can help balance out a weaker GPA. For additional questions about GPA and ACT/SAT scores, contact admission@lmu.edu.

How to upload the video sample


To submit the video sample, create an account on Vimeo or YouTube and upload the link to your film for your portfolio. LMU SFTV discourages setting a password protection for project submissions, as this may cause a delay in the application review process.

To join Vimeo:
  1. Go to: Vimeo.com.
  2. Input your name, email address, and password. Agree to the terms and conditions. Click Join.
  3. Basic Vimeo is all that is required.
  4. To create a channel, go to the channels page located in the top middle of the home screen and click “Create a channel.”
  5. To upload a video, click on the "Upload" button in the main toolbar at the top right corner.
To join YouTube:
  1. Go to YouTube.com.
  2. Click the “Sign in” button located on the top left of the screen.
  3. Click the “Create an account” button on the top left of the screen.
  4. Input your name, email address, username, and password.
  5. Confirm from the email sent to your account.
  6. To upload a video, click the "Upload" button in the top left corner.

Can LMU students apply for internal admission to the School of Film and Television?


Yes, depending on their program and year of study. The following majors are not accepting internal admission due to unprecedented levels of enrollment:
  • Film and Television Production
  • Animation (major and minor)
  • Recording Arts
To apply for internal admission to the Screenwriting major (or minor) or the Film, Television, and Media Studies major, book an appointment with an LMU SFTV advisor ASAP for spring 2024 pre-registration.

LMU SFTV's Screenwriting B.A. and Minor

LMU SFTV’s pre-professional Screenwriting B.A. program (and minor) prepares undergraduates to seek high-level writing roles in the industry. Undergraduates experiment with screenwriting for feature films, short films, and mobile screens. In courses of 10-12 students, undergraduates broaden their understanding of the myriad of ethical and social issues that impact screenwriting and the industry.

Screenwriting B.A. students also earn coveted internships and attend workshops and panels with noteworthy industry figures, such as Alexander Payne (The Descendants, Sideways), Brian Helgeland (Mystic River, L.A. Confidential), and Robin Swicord (The Jane Austen Book Club, Memoirs of a Geisha).

The typical Screenwriting B.A. student takes five courses per semester (15 credit hours) across four years of full-time study. Years 1-2 focus on the basic aesthetic and technical aspects of film in the U.S. and worldwide, while years 3-4 focus on rewriting and adapting screenplays. Filmmakers leave with a mastery of narrative structure, tone, and navigating the front-to-end process of translating script to screen. Take a look at the year-over-year breakdown.

Screenwriting B.A.​


Year 1


Fall
  • PROD 101 - Introduction to Screen Production (3 semester hours)
  • FTVS 1010 - Art of Cinema (4 semester hours)
  • FFYS 1000 - First Year Seminar (3-4 semester)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Spring

  • SCWR 120 - Storytelling for the Screen (3 semester hours)
  • RHET 1000 - Rhetorical Arts (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Year 2


Fall Semester
  • FTVS 2117 - World Cinema 2, 1955-1990 (4 semester hours), or any FTVS 2000-, 3000-, or 4000-level class (4 semester hours).
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Spring Semester

  • SCWR 220 - Beginning Screenwriting (3 semester hours) (must earn B or better; may be taken in the fall semester of the sophomore year)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Year 3​


Fall Semester
  • SCWR 320 - Intermediate Screenwriting (3 semester hours)
  • FTVS Upper Division Elective (3 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Spring Semester

  • SCWR 321 - Rewriting the Feature (3 semester hours)
  • Select between:
    • SCWR 325 - Writing the TV Situation Comedy (3 semester hours) (may be taken concurrently with SCWR 320)
      OR
    • SCWR 426 - Writing One-Hour Episodic TV (3 semester hours)Select between:
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Year 4​


Fall Semester
  • SCWR 329 - Directing for Screenwriters (3 semester hours) (may also be taken in the Spring of the senior year)
  • SCWR 420 - Senior Writing Project (3 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Spring Semester

  • SCWR 421 - Rewriting the Senior Writing Project (3 semester hours)
  • SCWR 428 - Adaptation: Source to Screen (3 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Screenwriting minor​


Semesters 1-2​

  • Select between:
    • FTVS 1010 - Art of the Cinema (4 semester hours)
      OR
    • FTVS 1020 - Art of Screen Media (4 semester hours)
  • SCWR 220 - Beginning Screenwriting (3 semester hours)
  • SCWR 320 - Intermediate Screenwriting (3 semester hours)
  • SCWR 321 - Rewriting the Feature (3 semester hours)
  • Two elective courses (6 semester hours) chosen from:
    • SCWR 325 - Writing the TV Situation Comedy (3 semester hours)
    • SCWR 326 - Writing One-Hour Episodic TV (3 semester hours)
    • SCWR 428 - Adaptation: One Medium to Another (3 semester hours)
    • Other 300- and 400-level courses by permission of Chairperson

How to apply​


A limited number of seats are available every semester to LMU SFTV undergraduates. To apply for the Screenwriting minor, LMU SFTV students must take three prerequisite courses:

  • SCWR 120 Storytelling for the Screen (3 semester hours), completed with a grade of A- or better.
  • FTVS 1010 Art of Cinema (4 semester hours), completed with a grade of A- or better, OR FTVS 1020 Art of Screen Media (4 semester hours), completed with a grade of A- or better.
  • SCWR 220 Beginning Screenwriting (3 semester hours), completed with a grade of A- or better.

To be considered, undergraduates must also supply creative samples and two evaluations from former faculty. Applications are available through SFTV Advising in March and October of each year.

LMU SFTV's Film and Television Producing B.A.

LMU SFTV’s Film and Production B.A. program gives undergraduates the necessary skills for directing and producing for television. Each course promotes mastery of the filmmaking process from conceiving and pitching ideas to the post-production phase. Many undergraduates are admitted with no prior experience collaborating on films, and all undergraduates complete the program with strong portfolios and the toolkit to become multidimensional industry professionals.

Intersectionality, historical trends, and emerging technologies in the industry underscore the program. Years 1-2 prepare film students with an arsenal of industry best practices and a deep dive into telling stories that excite audiences. As upperclassmen, film students specialize in one of six areas:
  • Creative Producing
  • Production Management/Assistant Directing
  • Directing
  • Cinematography
  • Post-Production
  • Online Storytelling
By year 4, film students work in their chosen specializations. Take a look at the year-over-year program breakdown.

Year 1​


Fall
  • SCWR 120 - Storytelling for the Screen (3 semester hours)
  • FTVS 1010 - Art of Cinema (4 semester hours)
  • FFYS 1000 - First Year Seminar (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours
Spring

  • PROD 101 - Production Bootcamp (3 semester hours)
  • RHET 1000 - Rhetorical Arts (3-4 semester hours)
  • FTVS 1020 - Art of Screen Media (4 semester hours) Recommended, not required
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Year 2​


Fall Semester
  • PROD 200 - Making the Short Film (3 semester hours)
  • RECA 250 - Sound Design (3 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours
Spring

  • PROD 250 - Writing, Producing, and Directing Episodic Television (3 semester hours) or ANY 200-, 300- or 400-level Production course 3 semester hours (may be taken any semester)
  • PROD 341 - Cinematography I (3 semester hours)
  • PROD 379 - Directing I: From Script to Stage (3 semester hours)
  • Select between:
    • SCWR 327 Developing and Writing the Short Film (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 326 Intermediate Pre-Production (3 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Year 3​


Fall Semester
  • PROD 366 - Post Production I (3 semester hours), (may also be taken concurrently with PROD 390 or PROD 392)
  • Select between:
    • FTVS 2100 World Cinema 1 (1895-1955) (4 semester hours)
      OR
    • FTVS 2117World Cinema 2 (1955-1990) (4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours
Spring

  • Select between:
    • PROD 390 - Intermediate Production: Producing and Directing the Fiction Short (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 392 -Intermediate Production: Producing and Directing the Documentary Short (3 semester hours)
  • RECA 367 - Sound for Filmmakers (3 semester hours), (required concurrently with PROD 390 or 392)
  • FTVS Upper Division Elective (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Year 4​


Fall OR Spring
  • Select between:
    • PROD 490 - Advanced Production: Producing and Directing the Fiction Short (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 492 - Advanced Production: Producing and Directing the Documentary Short (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 460 - Capstone Experience: Advanced Practicum (3 semester hours)
  • Select 3 semester hours, among:
    • PROD 380 Music Video Production (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 381 Production Design (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 431 Web Series Development (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 433 Developing, Selling, and Monetizing Digital Content (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 435 Film and Television Development (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 439 Producing Master Class (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 440 - Cinematography III (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 466 - Advanced Editing: Practicum for Editors (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 464 - Visual Effects (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • RECA 467 Post-Production Sound (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 484 Visual Design (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 488 Directing the Camera (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 489 - Advanced Directing Seminar (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • PROD 480 - Advanced Production Seminar (1-3 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

LMU SFTV’s Film, TV and Media Studies B.A. and Minor

LMU SFTV’s Film and Media Studies BA major (and minor) is ideal for filmmakers interested in a diverse range of careers, including film criticism, journalism, and attending graduate programs with the aim of teaching film. From day one, film students conduct a deep analysis of the historical, ethical and socio-cultural contexts and trends of American and global media. They complete the program with exceptional writing and speaking skills for their chosen careers. However, the program does not offer hands-on filmmaking experience.

Years 1-2 teaches film students essential skills in the rhetorical arts, identifying genres and categories for American and global films, and more. Years 3-4 give film students the freedom to self-design much of their coursework around their post-graduation goals. Take a look at the year-over-year program breakdown.

Film, TV and Media Studies B.A.​


Year 1​

Fall
  • FTVS 1010 - Art of Cinema (4 semester hours)
  • FFYS 1000 - First Year Seminar (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Spring

  • FTVS 1020 - Art of Screen Media (4 semester hours)
  • RHET 1000 - Rhetorical Arts (3-4 semester hours)
  • SFTV Creative Core (3 semester hours)
    • Select from ANIM 120, PROD 101, SCWR 120
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Year 2​

Fall
  • FTVS 2100 - World Cinema 1 (1895-1955) (4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Spring

  • FTVS 3320 - Introduction to Film/Media Theory (4 semester hours)
  • FTVS National or Regional Topic (4 semester hours)
    • Select from FTVS 2120, FTVS 2127, FTVS 4410, FTVS 4420, FTVS 4447, FTVS 4457, or FTVS 4467
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Year 3

Fall
  • FTVS Elective (4 semester hours)
    • Select from FTVS 2130, FTVS 2137, FTVS 3200, FTVS 3210, FTVS 3220, FTVS 3230, FTVS 3300, FTVS 3310, FTVS 4500, FTVS 4507, FTVS 4510, FTVS 4517, FTVS 4600, FTVS 4607, FTVS 4610, FTVS 4617, FTVS 4700, FTVS 4707
      (two of four electives must have a National / Regional Focus and be selected from courses ending in 7)
  • FTVS National or Regional Topic (4 semester hours)
    • Select from FTVS 2120, FTVS 2127, FTVS 4410, FTVS 4420, FTVS 4447, FTVS 4457, FTVS 4467
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Spring

  • FTVS Elective (4 semester hours)
    • Select from FTVS 2130, FTVS 2137, FTVS 3200, FTVS 3210, FTVS 3220, FTVS 3230, FTVS 3300, FTVS 3310, FTVS 4500, FTVS 4507, FTVS 4510, FTVS 4517, FTVS 4600, FTVS 4607, FTVS 4610, FTVS 4617, FTVS 4700, FTVS 4707
      (two of four electives must have a National / Regional Focus and be selected from courses ending in 7)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Year 4​

Fall
  • FTVS Elective (4 semester hours)
    • Select from FTVS 2130, FTVS 2137, FTVS 3200, FTVS 3210, FTVS 3220, FTVS 3230, FTVS 3300, FTVS 3310, FTVS 4500, FTVS 4507, FTVS 4510, FTVS 4517, FTVS 4600, FTVS 4607, FTVS 4610, FTVS 4617, FTVS 4700, FTVS 4707
      (two of four electives must have a National / Regional Focus and be selected from courses ending in 7)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Upper Division Elective (3-4 semester hours)
  • Upper Division Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Spring

  • FTVS Elective (4 semester hours)
    • selected from FTVS 2130, FTVS 2137, FTVS 3200, FTVS 3210, FTVS 3220, FTVS 3230, FTVS 3300, FTVS 3310, FTVS 4500, FTVS 4507, FTVS 4510, FTVS 4517, FTVS 4600, FTVS 4607, FTVS 4610, FTVS 4617, FTVS 4700, FTVS 4707
      (two of four electives must have a National/Regional Focus and be selected from courses ending in 7)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Upper Division Elective (3-4 semester hours)
  • Upper Division Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Film, TV and Media Studies Minor​


Semesters 1-2
  • Select between:
    • FTVS 1010 Art of Cinema (4 semester hours)
      OR
    • FTVS 1020 Art of Screen Media (4 semester hours)
  • Select between:
    • FTVS 2100 World Cinema 1, 1895-1955 (4 semester hours)
      OR
    • FTVS 2117 World Cinema 2, 1955-1990 (4 semester hours)
  • One Genre / Authors course (4 semester hours)
    • Select from FTVS 2130, FTVS 2137, FTVS 4500, FTVS 4507, FTVS 4510, FTVS 4600, FTVS 4607, FTVS 4610, FTVS 4617
  • One National Film/International Television course (4 semester hours)
    • Select from FTVS 2127, FTVS 4420, FTVS 4437, FTVS 4447, FTVS 4457, FTVS 4467
  • One elective course chosen from any upper division FTVS course (4 semester hours)

LMU SFTV’s Recording Arts B.A.

LMU SFTV’s Recording Arts B.A. program attracts undergraduates who aspire to work as sound designers and dialogue editors. In four years, undergraduates master the fundamentals of sound recording, sound reproduction, and sound design in courses taught by industry experts. In addition, they must take a minimum of one music course with an emphasis on music theory.

Year 1 introduces film students to essential elements of how music supports storytelling, film rhetoric, and music production. Years 3-4 dive into advanced sound production and sound editing methodologies, plus the science of sound. Film students graduate from the program with an understanding of sound at the physical and psychoacoustic levels, and they are fully prepared to design mix audio and create scores that elevate every type of narrative. Take a look at the year-over-year program breakdown.

Year 1​

Fall
  • Select between:
    • FTVS 1010 - Art of Cinema (4 semester hours)
      OR
    • FTVS 1020 - Art of Screen Media (4 semester hours)
  • MUSC 104 - Fundamentals of Music (3 semester hours)
  • FFYS 1000 - First Year Seminar (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Spring

  • RECA 220 - Fundamentals of Sound (3 semester hours) (must earn B or better)
  • PROD 101 - Introduction to Screen Production (3 semester hours)
  • MUSC 107 - The Piano Experience (3 semester hours) (may test out per RECA chair)
  • RHET 1000 - Rhetorical Arts (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)

Year 2​


Fall
  • RECA 250 - Sound Design (3 semester hours) (must earn B or better)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Spring

  • RECA 258 - Digital Sound Editing (3 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Year 3​


Fall
  • RECA 322 - Recording Technology (3 semester hours)
  • RECA 353 - Production Sound Techniques (3 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Spring

  • RECA 358 - Post-Production Sound (3 semester hours)
  • RECA 361 - Live and Studio Recording (3 semester hours)
  • RECA 362 - Audio Software Applications (3 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-17 semester hours

Year 4​


Fall
  • RECA 461 - Multi-Track Studio Recording (3 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Spring

  • RECA 464 - Advanced Audio (3 semester hours)
  • RECA 470 - Senior Recording Arts Project (3 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

LMU SFTV’s Animation B.A. and Minor

LMU SFTV's Animation B.A. program (and minor) prepares undergraduates for careers in the film industry, the video game industry, and other forms of interactive digital media. The program is steeped in classical animation theory and techniques while preparing film students to navigate new and cutting-edge techniques in the ever-changing animation field. Film students progress from coursework in film theory and rhetoric to drafting storyboards to making animated films. Instructors have experience in 2D/3D digital animation, composited effects, stop motion, pixilation, Maya, AfterEffects, Flash, movement expression, and games animation.

Years 1-2 focus on the history of animation, 2D animation vs. 3D animation technologies, and the visual storytelling development cycle, and film students create their first animated films. By the end of year 2, film students petition to specialize in Traditional, 3D, or Interactive animation (on the condition of successfully completing all lower division courses).

Years 3-4 allow film students to take higher-division electives and diverge into small crews to create animated films. The program concludes with the self-developed animated film thesis project. Take a look at the year-over-year program breakdown.

Animation B.A.​


Year 1​


Fall
  • ANIM 100 - History of Animation (3 semester hours)
  • ANIM 210 - Visual Story Development (3 semester hours)
  • ART 153 - Drawing I (3 semester hours)
  • FFYS 1000 - First Year Seminar (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-17 semester hours
Spring

  • ANIM 101 - Discovering Animation (3 semester hours) (must earn B or better), ECRE Core
  • ART 154 - Drawing II: Figure Drawing (3 semester hours)
  • Select between:
    • FTVS 1010 - Art of Cinema (4 semester hours)
      OR
    • FTVS 1020 - Art of Screen Media (4 semester hours)
  • SCWR 120 - Storytelling for the Screen (3 semester hours)
  • RHET 1000 - Rhetorical Arts (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-17 semester hours

Year 2​


Fall
  • ANIM 220 - Intermediate Animation Workshop (3 semester hours)
  • ANIM 260 - Digital Toolbox (3 semester hours)
  • ART 3100 - Figure Drawing Workshop (2 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours
Spring

  • ANIM 230 - Introduction to 3-D Computer Animation (3 semester hours)
  • ANIM 250 - Introduction to Interactive Animation (3 semester hours)
  • ART 3100 - Figure Drawing Workshop (2 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Year 3​


Fall Semester
  • ANIM Upper Division Elective (3 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours
Spring

  • ANIM Upper Division Elective (3 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Year 4​


Fall Semester
  • ANIM 495 - Senior Thesis Project / Pre-Production (3 semester hours)
  • ANIM Upper Division Elective (3 semester hours)
  • University Core (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours
Spring

  • ANIM 490 - Animation Practicum (3 semester hours)
  • ANIM 496 - Senior Thesis Project / Production (3 semester hours)
  • ANIM Upper Division Elective (3 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
  • Elective (3-4 semester hours)
Total: 15-16 semester hours

Animation Minor


Semesters 1-2
  • ANIM 101 - Discovering Animation (3 semester hours)
  • ANIM 210 - Visual Story Development (3 semester hours)
  • Select between:
    • ANIM 230 - Introduction to 3D Computer Animation (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • ANIM 250 - Introduction to Interactive Animation (3 semester hours)
      OR
    • ANIM 100 - History of Animation (3 semester hours)
  • Three elective courses chosen from 300 and 400 level Animation courses under the direction of the Chairperson (9 semester hours)

How to Submit the LMU Graduate Division Application for 2024 Entry

Graduate applicants must fill out two applications: the LMU Graduate Division application and the SFTV Supplemental application. Both applications are online. The Graduate Division application includes core supporting academic materials, while the SFTV Supplemental application contains creative portfolio materials

Prospective graduates can only apply once each year for one M.F.A. program. As of Fall 2023, LMU SFTV only admits graduate applicants for the fall semester.

How to complete the LMU Graduate Division Application for 2024


  1. Graduate Online Application: Fill out the graduate online application (plus pay the $50 non-refundable application fee).
  2. Official Transcripts: Contact the Registrar's Office of each college or university you have attended and request one official copy of your transcripts be sent to the Graduate Admissions Office. If ordering electronic transcripts, request one copy be released to graduateadmission@lmu.edu. For current or former LMU students, please read here. Unofficial transcripts cannot be uploaded. Transcripts should be sent to:
Graduate Admissions Office
Loyola Marymount University
1 LMU Drive, Charles Von der Ahe Building, Suite 235
Los Angeles, CA 90045-2659
  1. Transcript / Credit Evaluation: Applicants who have completed their post-secondary education from an institution outside the U.S. must have their transcripts evaluated and translated by a U.S.-based transcript evaluation service before the application is considered for admission. The purpose of the evaluation is to verify that your post-secondary degree is the equivalent of a U.S. Bachelor's degree. A "course-by-course" transcript evaluation identifying your GPA is required. A few commonly used evaluation service agencies are as follows:
  1. English Language Proficiency Requirement (International Applicants Only)*: Applicants must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) unless they received a high school diploma or a bachelor's degree in the United States. Exceptions to this rule may be made for students from countries where English is one of several official languages, as well as at the discretion of the school's administration. The minimum TOEFL score for admission into most graduate programs is 100 internet-based and IELTS Overall Band Score of 7. Please request that ETS or IELTS send your official scores to LMU Graduate Admissions. The LMU Institution Code is 4403 to request the TOEFL.
  1. GRE Scores: The GRE is required for all applicants with an undergraduate GPA below 3.0.
*Note: If, after admission to a graduate program, an applicant's proficiency in English should prove inadequate, the University reserves the right to require additional proficiency in English. Failure to comply will result in disqualification from the graduate program.

FilmSchool.org admitted student perspective

@wuzpoppin says: "The process was straightforward like the others. The time-intensive parts were the creative samples: two half-hour scripts and one creative challenge. I re-used the same personal statement I wrote for my USC application and re-recorded the same personal "Video Recording" I used for USC."

@brel23 says: "Every interaction I have had with LMU's faculty and staff have been great; I had a great feeling about them in the fall and they asked if I'd like to visit the facilities. So, I took a chance and flew out from NY to LA, and had a great meeting and tour. When it came time for my admissions interview, it went well. They asked where I was currently working, and they asked me to talk to them about my writing."

For more information, make a virtual appointment with a graduate admissions advisor to discuss applying to and attending LMU SFTV. You can also email sftvgradprograms@lmu.edu or call 310.258.4630.

Admissions Requirements for LMU SFTV International Graduate Applicants

LMU SFTV welcomes filmmakers from all backgrounds and nations. The application process for undergraduates and graduates is the same for domestic students, but international applicants must also show English proficiency and have their transcripts evaluated.

How do transcript evaluations work for international students?​


LMU SFTV requires official transcripts from all schools attended since high school. International applicants who have completed their post-secondary education from an institution outside the United States (U.S.) must hold a degree from a university recognized by the Ministry of Education as a degree granting institution.

Transcripts from an international institution must be translated and evaluated by a U.S. transcript evaluation service (e.g., Educational Credential Evaluators, International Education Research Foundation or World Education Services) before the application is considered for admission.

What are LMU's TOEFL (and IELTS) English proficiency requirements?


International applicants who do not speak English as a second language must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). The TOEFL/IELTS requirement is waived if International applicants received a high school diploma or a bachelor's degree in the U.S., live in a country where English is an official language, or received a bachelor's degree from an institution of higher learning where courses are taught in English.

Take a look at the English language proficiency FAQ for graduates and undergraduates from LMU's website:

What is the minimum TOEFL score required for undergraduates?

The University’s minimum standard for undergraduate admission is 90 on the Internet-based TOEFL.

What is the minimum TOEFL score required for graduates?

The minimum TOEFL score for admission into most graduate programs is 100.

When is the deadline to submit TOEFL scores?

TOEFL scores should be submitted by the application deadline.

What are alternatives to taking the TOEFL?

Complete an English Composition course at a U.S. college or university:
  • Minimum grade of C or better
    • Online courses are not accepted


Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE)
  • Minimum score of 53 for undergraduate admission.
  • Duolingo English Test
    • Minimum score of 110 for undergraduate admission.

What is LMU’s TOEFL Institution code?

4403.

After admission to a graduate program, if the applicant's proficiency in English should prove inadequate, the University reserves the right to require additional proficiency in English. Failure to comply will result in disqualification from the graduate program.

What are LMU's international application deadlines?


International applicants follow the same application deadlines as domestic applicants. However, the University recommends international applicants submit their applications at a minimum of three months prior to the deadline.

For more information about important financial aid, housing information, and required forms, read LMUs overview for newly admitted international students.​

How to Apply to LMU SFTV's Film and Television Production M.F.A. Program for 2024 Entry

LMU SFTV’s Film and Television Production M.F.A program prepares graduates to hone their artistic skills while developing practical industry knowledge. This comprehensive filmmaking program empowers participants to find or switch their area of specialization while learning how to navigate the film industry.

The first portion of the three-year M.F.A. focuses on core courses. Foundational courses prepare film students to create 3-5 short narrative or documentary film projects. The second portion allows graduates to specialize in one of the following areas:
  1. Directing fiction (narrative)
  2. Directing non-fiction (documentary)
  3. Creative producing
  4. Cinematography
  5. Editing
After choosing a specialization, graduates develop the thesis film. A total of 60 credits is required to graduate. Take a look at the year-over-year program breakdown and creative portfolio requirements.

Year 1​


Fall
  • PROD 500 - Directing the Short Film I: Vision and Exploration
  • PROD 541 - Intro to Cinematography
  • PROD 566 - Intro to Post-Production
  • SCWR 501 - Fundamentals of Cinematic Storytelling
Spring
  • Select between:
    • PROD 530 - Intermediate Documentary Pre-Production
      OR
    • SCWR 530 - Screenwriting for Intermediate Production
  • PROD 550 - Directing the Short Film II: Visual Storytelling
  • PROD 570 - Production Planning
  • RECA 500 - Sound for Production

Year 2 (I)​


Fall Semester

  • PROD 600 - Directing the Short Film III: Directing Actors (6 units)
  • RECA 567 - Seminar in Sound

Year 2 (Declaration of Specialization) and Year 3​

The Spring semester of year 2 and the entirety of year 3 allow graduates to specialize in one of five areas. This overview also includes the final deliverable materials necessary to graduate from the M.F.A. program.

CREATIVE PRODUCING​


Year 2​


Spring
  • PROD 633 - Developing, Selling, & Monetizing Digital Content
  • PROD 639 - Producing Master Class
  • FTVS 513 - Seminar in American Film
  • IFTV 6100 - Intern Practicum (zero units)

Year 3​


Fall
  • SCWR 685 - Entertainment Business Affairs
  • FTVS 514 - Seminar in International Film
  • Advanced Elective - Select from the following:
    • SCWR 551 - Seminar in Feature Writing
    • PROD 635 - Film & TV Development
    • SCWR 554 - Writers Room
    • SCWR 660 - Writing the Spec Drama
    • SCWR 670 - Writing the Spec Comedy
    • Others by permission of Coordinator
Spring
  • PROD 675 - Thesis Portfolio
  • Advanced Elective - See Above
  • FTVS Elective - Any 500 or 600-level FTVS course

Final Deliverables​

  • 25-60 minutes of content from PROD 650, PROD 490/492 and/or WPTV Thesis projects. Other projects (e.g, PROD 600, music videos, films from other graduate institution thesis programs or professional work shot DURING applicant’s second and third year) accepted only at committee’s discretion. Must include a minimum of two projects.
  • A three-page reflection paper on your produced films
  • Complete a project consisting of a Bible, pitching material, business marketing strategy, and pitch presentation for industry and a look book.
  • A web series idea composed of either a written treatment and visual pitch OR a completed digital POC.
  • A rip/tone reel or visual sales tool for the web series, TV show or feature.

DIRECTING FICTION​


Year 2​


Spring
  • FTVS 513 - Seminar in American Film
  • SCRW 620 - Writing the Narrative Production Thesis
  • IFTV 6100 - Intern Practicum (zero units)
  • Advanced Elective - Students choose the first of three advanced elective courses in Directing Fiction:
    • PROD 633 – Developing, Selling & Monetizing Digital Content
    • PROD 635: Film & TV Devel (Spring only)
    • PROD 639: Producing Master Class
    • PROD 642: Intermediate Cinematography (Spring only)
    • PROD 664: Visual Effects (Spring only)
    • PROD 666: Advanced Editing
    • PROD 680: Music Video Production (Fall only)
    • PROD 680: Advanced Directing Seminar
    • PROD 685: Visual Design (Summer only)
    • PROD 685: Editing/Finishing Short (Spring only)
    • PROD 685: DIT Workshop (*note only 1 unit)
    • PROD 685: Post Prod Supervisor Workshop (*note only 2 credits, spring only)
    • PROD 685: Seminar in Directing
    • PROD 687: Working with Actors
    • PROD 688: Directing the Camera (Spring only)
    • SCWR 551: Feature Screenwriting
    • SCWR 554: TV Writers Room
    • SCWR 660: Writing the Spec Drama
    • SCWR 670: Writing the Spec Comedy
    • Any other 3-units of Advanced Electives (AE) that are pre-approved by the coordinator

Year 3​


Fall
  • PROD 650 - Thesis Production
  • FTVS 514 - Seminar in International Film
  • Advanced Elective - Select from the list above
Spring
  • PROD 670 - Thesis Post-Production
  • Advanced Elective - Select from the list above
  • FTVS Elective - Any 500 or 600-level FTVS course

Final Deliverables​

  • Completed fiction film 8-15 minutes in length
  • Festival plan and promotional materials


DIRECTING NON-FICTION​


Year 2​


Spring
  • FTVS 513 - Seminar in American Film
  • PROD 626 - Pre-production for Documentary Thesis
  • IFTV 6100 - Intern Practicum (zero units)
  • Advanced Elective - Students choose the first of three advanced elective courses in Directing Non-Fiction:
    • PROD 633 – Developing, Selling & Monetizing Digital Content
    • PROD 635: Film & TV Devel (Spring only)
    • PROD 639: Producing Master Class
    • PROD 642: Intermediate Cinematography (Spring only)
    • PROD 664: Visual Effects (Spring only)
    • PROD 666: Advanced Editing
    • PROD 680: Music Video Production (Fall only)
    • PROD 680: Advanced Directing Seminar
    • PROD 685: Visual Design (Summer only)
    • PROD 685: Editing/Finishing Short (Spring only)
    • PROD 685: DIT Workshop (*note only 1 unit)
    • PROD 685: Post Prod Supervisor Workshop (*note only 2 credits, spring only)
    • PROD 685: Seminar in Directing
    • PROD 687: Working with Actors
    • PROD 688: Directing the Camera (Spring only)
    • SCWR 554: TV Writers Room
    • SCWR 660: Writing the Spec Drama
    • SCWR 670: Writing the Spec Comedy
    • Any other 3-units of Advanced Electives (AE) that are pre-approved by the coordinator

Year 3​


Fall
  • PROD 650 - Thesis Production
  • FTVS 514 - Seminar in International Film
  • Advanced Elective - Select from the list above

Spring
  • PROD 670 - Thesis Post-Production
  • Advanced Elective - Select from the list above
  • FTVS Elective - Any 500 or 600-level FTVS course

Final Deliverables​

  • Completed documentary film 8-20 minutes in length
  • Festival plan and promotional materials

CINEMATOGRAPHY​


Year 2​


Spring
  • PROD 642 - Intermediate Cinematography
  • PROD 567 - Color Correction
  • FTVS 513 - Seminar in American Film
  • IFTV 6100 - Intern Practicum (zero units)

Year 3​

Fall
  • PROD 649 - Advanced Cinematography
  • FTVS 514 - Seminar in International Film
  • Advanced Elective - Students choose the first of three advanced elective courses in Cinematography:
    • PROD 688 - Directing the Camera (Spring Only)
    • PROD 685 - Music Video Production (Fall Only)
    • PROD 685 - Visual Design (Summer Only)
    • PROD 666 - Advanced Editing
    • PROD 685 - DIT Workshop (*1 unit only)
    • PROD 685 - Post Production Supervisor Workshop (*2 units only)
Spring
  • PROD 675 - Thesis Portfolio
  • Advanced Elective - Select from the list above
  • FTVS Elective - Any 500 or 600-level FTVS course

Final Deliverables​

  • 2- to 4-minute cinematography reel
  • Online portfolio / website (reviewed by thesis committee)
  • A completed personal marketing package
  • 25-60 minutes of content from PROD 650, PROD 490/492 and/or WPTV Thesis projects. Other projects (e.g, music videos, PROD 600, films from other graduate institution Thesis programs or professional work shot DURING applicant’s second and third year) accepted only at committee’s discretion. Must include a minimum of three projects.

EDITING​


Year 2​


Spring
  • FTVS 513 - Seminar in American Film
  • IFTV 6100 - Intern Practicum (zero units)
  • Advanced Elective - Six units selected from the following:
    • RECA 568 - Advanced Post-Production Sound
    • PROD 664 - Visual Effects
    • PROD 642 - Intermediate Cinematography
    • PROD 567 - Color Correction
    • PROD 685 - DIT Workshop (1 unit)
    • PROD 685 - Post-Production Supervisor Workshop (2 units)

Year 3​


Fall
  • PROD 666 - Advanced Editing
  • FTVS 514 - Seminar in International Film
  • Advanced Elective - Select from the list above
Spring
  • PROD 675 - Thesis Portfolio
  • PROD 685 - Editing and Finishing the Short Film
  • FTVS Elective - Any 500 or 600-level FTVS course

Final Deliverables​

  • 2- to 5-minute editing reel
  • Online portfolio / website
  • Trailers for completed films
  • 25-60 minutes of content from PROD 650, PROD 490/492 and/or WPTV Thesis projects. Other projects (e.g. music videos, PROD 400/600, films from other graduate institution thesis programs or professional work completed DURING applicant’s second and third year) accepted only at committee’s discretion. Must include a minimum of two projects
  • Post-production schedules, budgets, and workflows for each project

How to apply​


1. Personal Statement: In 1,200 words or fewer, tell the the Office of Admission your story. How have your life experiences, choices, and values shaped you? Is there an unforgettable moment in your life that has impacted you? What are the unique stories you want to tell as a filmmaker? Discuss artists (filmmakers or otherwise) and creative influences that have inspired you. Why do you want to attend a graduate film program, and why specifically the Film and Television Production program at Loyola Marymount University? What specialization (Creative Producing, Directing Fiction, Directing Non-Fiction, Cinematography, and Editing) are you most interested in, and why?

2. Visual Sample: LMU SFTV considers applicants with a unique voice and vision, storytellers who are in the early stages of their filmmaking careers, as well as more experienced applicants. Submit the following visual sample: A two-to-three-minute film shot with your cell phone and edited with any digital software in response to the following prompt: "An interesting person, place, or thing, I recently discovered."

3. Creative Sample: Submit a half-to-one-page outline of a short-format film project you would like to create. This outline should be in treatment form (not script format). It should give us a sense of the stories you want to tell, and the genres you want to work in.

4. Video Recording: Create a video of two minutes, telling us who you are and what kind of stories you want to tell. Simply record yourself telling your story on camera. Do not script it, and do not 'perform' – be yourself! The recording will not be viewed past the two-minute mark.

5. Portfolio List: The portfolio list is a written record of your creative material, including but not limited to film or television. It should include the title and a logline (if appropriate), the year of completion, and your creative role in its production. The material should give an idea of the range and depth of your creative experiences so far. Formal recognition, such as awards, publications, jobs and exhibitions, should be noted. The name of the institution or publication should be included when listing creative materials prepared for a class or publication. Please do not submit any of these materials — submit only a list of your work. An example of the Portfolio List:
  • July 2014, A Day in the Life, digital video, 12 minutes. Creative role: Writer/director. A documentary on a homeless Iraq vet who has lived on the streets since his return from the military. Created for senior-year multimedia project, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.
  • March 2013, Doorways, a series of five black-and-white photographs. Creative role: Photographer. "Second Prize Winner" in the Des Moines Sunday Journal photo contest.
  • February 2011, Cellomorphosis, short story. Creative role: Writer. A variation on the novella by Franz Kafka: published in Writing, vol. IV, 2010, at Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts.
5. A One-Page Resume. List your professional and creative achievements, including film industry-related grants and awards.

6. Two Letters of Recommendation: Select your recommenders carefully, as this is a critical portion of your application. Each recommender must have supervised your work. Do NOT send letters from colleagues or friend. Provide one academic letter and one professional letter, or two academic letters. You must submit the recommenders' information through the online graduate application. Recommenders will be required to submit the letters electronically. It is the applicant's responsibility to ensure that the letters are received.

Ready to apply?​


Click here to fill out the online graduate application.

How to Apply to LMU SFTV’s Writing for the Screen M.F.A. Program for 2024 Entry

New and seasoned screenwriters can flourish in LMU SFTV’s Writing for the Screen M.F.A. program. The University's highly acclaimed, three-year screenwriting program shows film students how to write for the silver screen, television, the web, mobile, and every format in between. The program emphasizes long-form storytelling, in contrast to other top 10 film schools that focus on short-form storytelling (including AFI).

Film students improve their skills in story development, character development, cinematic style, and storytelling structure. Film students learn how to tell vibrant stories that bridge the gaps between cultures and communities by touching on humanistic themes. The program provides helps screenwriters create diverse portfolios: By the end of the program, graduates complete three feature-length screenplays, one episodic teleplay, and a minimum of one original television pilot.

In addition to building upon their screenwriting skills, film students learn the business side of the industry by engaging with producers, managers, agents, and guest speakers from the Writers Guild of America. They also participate in mentorships, internships, and workshops that help generate screenplay ideas and networking opportunities. Take a look at the year-over-year program breakdown and creative portfolio requirements.

Year 1


Fall
  • SCWR 510 - Production Fundamentals for Screenwriters
  • SCWR 540 - Elements of Feature Screenwriting
  • SCWR 635 - Advanced Motion Picture Script Analysis
Spring
  • SCWR 541 - Writing the Feature Screenplay
  • SCWR 660 - Writing the Drama TV Spec Series or
    SCWR 670 - Writing the Comedy TV Spec Series

  • Film, TV, and Media Studies (FTVS) Elective

Year 2​


Fall
  • SCWR 640 - Rewriting the Feature Screenplay
  • SCWR 650 - Advanced Feature Screenwriting
  • SCWR 685 - The Business of Entertainment

Spring
  • SCWR 641 - Feature Film and Television Adaptation
  • SCWR 651 - Rewriting the Advanced Screenplay
  • SCWR 598 / 698 - Writing Elective or
    SCWR 661 - Writing an Original Drama Pilot or
    SCWR 671 - Writing an Original Comedy Pilot

Year 3​


Fall
  • SCWR 690 -Thesis Screenplay Project
  • SCRW 661 - Writing an Original Drama Pilot or 671 Writing an Original Comedy Pilot
  • SCWR 598 698 - Writing Elective

  • Spring
  • SCWR 691 - Rewriting Thesis Screenplay Project
  • SCWR 692 - Feature Film and Television Portfolio Workshop

How to apply​


1. Personal Statement: In 1000 words or fewer, write a creative essay or short story that expresses an understanding of how you became the writer you are today. This piece should reflect your unique perspective on life and the world.

2. Creative Samples: Applicants to the graduate program in Writing for the Screen and Writing and Producing for Television must complete the Creative Challenge. Please complete the following two components of the Creative Challenge (1) and the two writing samples (2):

Choose one of the following prompts and write a 3 page screenplay. Can be any genre. Please use proper script formatting.
  • At the beginning or end of the scene, a hand holds a knife.
  • One character has to break bad news to the other.
  • A confrontation scene in an extraordinary location.
  • A ride-sharing driver and their customer.
Two writing samples:
  • One feature length screenplay or teleplay (half-hour or one-hour; spec or pilot).
  • The second sample should be the first 30 pages of a feature length screenplay or a complete teleplay (half-hour or one-hour; spec or pilot.) Alternately, you may submit a short story or a one-act play.
3. Video Recording: Create up to a two-minute video telling us who you are and why you want to tell stories. Simply record yourself telling your story on-camera. Do not script it, nor do you need to 'perform' the event. The recording will not be viewed past the two-minute mark.

4. Two Letters of Recommendation: Select your recommenders carefully, as this is a critical portion of your application. Each recommender must have supervised your work. Do NOT send letters from colleagues or friends. We prefer that you provide one academic letter and one professional letter, or two academic letters. You must submit the recommenders' information through the online graduate application. Recommenders will be required to submit the letters electronically. It is the applicant's responsibility to ensure the letters are received.

5. A One-Page Resume: List your professional and creative achievements, including film industry-related grants and awards.

Ready to apply?​


Click here to fill out the graduate online application.

LMU SFTV’s Writing and Producing for TV M.F.A. Program for 2024 Entry

For filmmakers equally interested in screenwriting and production, LMU SFTV offers a unique production-intensive Writing and Producing for TV M.F.A. program. By mastering storytelling across various story structures and understanding how screenplays are translated into films, graduates learn how to become writer-directors and writer-producers. In workshops of only eight students, graduates learn how to conceive and refine stories and navigate the production and post-production.

In years 1-2, graduates focus on the development of spec scripts, pilots, and long-form teleplays — all of which are written in a writers room environment — and complete hands-on production courses. Award-winning faculty also provide mentorship opportunities. In year 3, graduates receive in-depth portfolio reviews, practice pitching, and network with key industry players.

At the end of the program, graduates have a dynamic portfolio of long- and short-form teleplays. They also participate in LMU SFTV's First Pitch, an annual event that allows graduates to pitch more than 40 casting agents, managers, and other industry professionals. Take a look at the year-over-year program breakdown and required creative portfolio materials.

Year 1​


Fall
  • SCWR 511 - Introduction to Television Production
  • SCWR 550 - Elements of Television Writing
  • FTVS 511 - History of Television
Spring
  • SCWR 660 - Writing Drama TV Series Spec or SCWR 670 Writing Comedy TV Series Spec
  • SCWR 551 - Feature Film Screenwriting
  • SCWR 554 - The TV Writer's Room

Year 2​


Fall
  • SCWR 661 - Writing an Original Drama Pilot
  • SCWR 671 - Writing an Original Comedy Pilot
  • SCWR 685 - The Business of Entertainment
Spring
  • SCWR 611 - Planning Ahead: Producing Fundamentals
  • SCWR 675 - Rewriting the TV Pilot: Drama or Comedy
  • SCWR Elective - Topics very semester to semester, including Playwriting, Video Game Writing, Digital Storytelling, Writing the Short Film

Year 3​


Fall
  • SCWR 680 - Preproduction for Thesis Project
  • SCWR Elective - Topics very semester to semester, including Playwriting, Video Game Writing, Digital Storytelling, Writing the Short Film
  • SCWR Elective - Topics very semester to semester, including Playwriting, Video Game Writing, Digital Storytelling, Writing the Short Film
Spring
  • SCWR 681 - Post-Production for Thesis Project
  • SCWR 692 - Feature Film and Television Portfolio Workshop

How to apply​


1. Personal Statement: Write a creative essay or short story that expresses an understanding of how you became the writer you are today. This piece should reflect your unique perspective on life and the world (fewer than 1000 words).

2. Creative Samples: Applicants to the graduate program in Writing for the Screen and Writing and Producing for Television must complete the Creative Challenge. Please complete the following two components of the Creative Challenge (1) and the two writing samples (2):

Choose one of the following prompts and write a 3 page screenplay (can be any genre; please use proper script formatting):
  • At the beginning or end of the scene, a hand holds a knife.
  • One character has to break bad news to the other.
  • A confrontation scene in an extraordinary location.
  • A ride-sharing driver and their customers.
Two writing samples:
  • One feature-length screenplay or teleplay (half-hour or one-hour; spec or pilot).
  • The second sample should be the first thirty pages of a feature-length screenplay or a complete teleplay (half-hour or one-hour; spec or pilot.) Alternately, you may submit a short story or a one-act play.
3. Video Recording: Create up to a two-minute video telling us who you are and why you want to tell stories. Simply record yourself telling your story on-camera. Do not script it, nor do you need to 'perform' the event. The recording will not be viewed past the two-minute mark.

4. Two Letters of Recommendation: Select your recommenders carefully, as this is a critical portion of your application. Each recommender must have supervised your work. Do NOT send letters from colleagues or friends. LMU SFTV prefers that you provide one academic letter and one professional letter, or two academic letters. You must submit the recommenders' information through the online graduate application. Recommenders will be required to submit the letters electronically. It is the applicant's responsibility to ensure the letters are received.

5. A One-Page Resume.

Ready to apply?


Click here to fill out the graduate online application.

Increase Your Chances of Acceptance to LMU SFTV

Loyola Marymount University School of Film and Television prepares filmmakers to tell emotionally compelling, diverse stories that reflect the human condition. Its intense but nurturing curriculum, idealistic location in LA’s Silicon Beach, and powerful alumni network also make LMU SFTV highly competitive.

To boost your LMU SFTV application, consider becoming a Supporting Member to receive unlimited access to 4,000+ applications in the Application Database, plus exclusive interviews with top film school admissions departments, filmmakers, and film students.

The FilmSchool.org forums can help you apply to LMU before upgrading your membership. If you need advice about creating your application, post in the Application Questions forum or The Waiting Game forum. Visit the Application Year Threads (MA/MFA or BA/BS) forum to see the past year's LMU SFTV threads and/or start or reply to a new one to connect with other aspiring film students.

Be sure to browse FilmSchool.org's archive of past LMU SFTV applications in our Application Database.

For additional information, contact:

Support other film students by logging your LMU SFTV application with FilmSchool.org​


Once you apply, be sure to log your application in our Application Database to help the site with our acceptance data for the program. Logging your application helps FilmSchool.org members see actual notification dates, accepted GPAs, test scores, and other important data. Your contributions are a great help to fellow (and future) LMU applicants.

Are you currently attending LMU or have you graduated from one of their film programs? Tell prospective film students about your experience in the comments section.

At FilmSchool.org, we aim to help you choose the best film school for you, simplify the application process, and navigate getting scholarships and financial aid. By learning about what your life will look like during and after film school, you can apply to your programs of choice and enter the industry with confidence. Supporting Memberships allow us to carry out our mission without undue influence from these film schools and keep our content as unbiased as possible.
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Alexa P.
Alexa Pellegrini (she/her) is a freelance copywriter, editor, poet, and essayist. Keep up with her latest musings on Twitter.

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