rohanam

New Member
hey,
What is your actual cost of attendance per year at grad school? And does LMU provide scholarships to international students?
Also, how are the internship opportunities at LMU?
 

A248

Member
hey,
What is your actual cost of attendance per year at grad school? And does LMU provide scholarships to international students?
Also, how are the internship opportunities at LMU?

It is hard to say for sure but it is roughly $25,000 per year for tuition. I've been fortunate enough to receive scholarships which have helped a lot. The School of Film and Television does give a scholarship that is available to international students as far as I'm aware. An internship is required to graduate from the program and there are MANY opportunities available because of our location LA and the faculty/staff in SFTV who are willing to help guide you to opportunities.
 

A248

Member
What was your portfolio and CV like before applying

When I applied to LMU I had been running my own production company for four years. I had been making films for about 7 years and had numerous projects screen at festivals, win awards, etc. However, some of my classmates came to LMU with no experience in film whatsoever so don't let expereience, or lack of dictate your decision to apply. I think the department likes a mix of experience/potential and people from a variety of professional/academic backgrounds.
 

Ayoxo

Member
When I applied to LMU I had been running my own production company for four years. I had been making films for about 7 years and had numerous projects screen at festivals, win awards, etc. However, some of my classmates came to LMU with no experience in film whatsoever so don't let expereience, or lack of dictate your decision to apply. I think the department likes a mix of experience/potential and people from a variety of professional/academic backgrounds.
Thanks. So what's the program like? Are they teaching you in all areas of filmmaking or do you choose whether it's directing, screenwriting etc you want
 

A248

Member
Thanks. So what's the program like? Are they teaching you in all areas of filmmaking or do you choose whether it's directing, screenwriting etc you want

Yes, the program is very well-rounded. The first year and a half is structured, so there is a progression of courses everyone takes. Year one you make a short fiction film in the spring, year two you make either a fiction or non fiction film in the fall, and year three is a thesis fiction or non fiction film. Mixed in with classes for pre-pro, production, and post for your films are some film history courses and the rest are electives. So you can really focus on whatever you want. I have taken a solid mix of screenwriting, sound, and directing/camera based classes. I am a documentary filmmaker so my second and third year films are docs and I take doc-specific classes for those.
 

Ayoxo

Member
Yes, the program is very well-rounded. The first year and a half is structured, so there is a progression of courses everyone takes. Year one you make a short fiction film in the spring, year two you make either a fiction or non fiction film in the fall, and year three is a thesis fiction or non fiction film. Mixed in with classes for pre-pro, production, and post for your films are some film history courses and the rest are electives. So you can really focus on whatever you want. I have taken a solid mix of screenwriting, sound, and directing/camera based classes. I am a documentary filmmaker so my second and third year films are docs and I take doc-specific classes for those.
Sounds nice. Just to clarify, you said each year you make a film, do you get to choose the role you play in making that film (whether director, screenwriter etc)
 

A248

Member
If you choose to do the fiction/non-fiction specialization you write/direct your three films. Last year, LMU introduced additional specializations for students who don't want to write and direct. They include creative production, cinematography, and editing. However, all students are still required to write/direct a first year film basically as an introductory experience to filmmaking/being on set. You can find more info here: Production Specializations - Loyola Marymount University
 

Ayoxo

Member
If you choose to do the fiction/non-fiction specialization you write/direct your three films. Last year, LMU introduced additional specializations for students who don't want to write and direct. They include creative production, cinematography, and editing. However, all students are still required to write/direct a first year film basically as an introductory experience to filmmaking/being on set. You can find more info here: Production Specializations - Loyola Marymount University
Thanks for the info
 
Hey!

I'm wondering what it's like to go into the program with experience professionally doing what you're learning in filmschool! Do you still find yourself learning a lot of new things, or is it mostly the other courses like cinematography and writing that help round out your skills?

Thanks for doing this!
 

A248

Member
Hey!

I'm wondering what it's like to go into the program with experience professionally doing what you're learning in filmschool! Do you still find yourself learning a lot of new things, or is it mostly the other courses like cinematography and writing that help round out your skills?

Thanks for doing this!

One thing that I think is great about film school (at least LMU) is that it teaches you a lot of skills that transcend filmmaking. Collaboration, working under deadlines, working with limited resources, teamwork, resilience...those are all things that my time at LMU has reinforced. Back to your question - yes I did have quite a bit of experience before I came to LMU, but I had never been trained to make films in a school setting. My undergrad degree is in communications, so most of what I learned was pretty broad. LMU has given me the chance to hone in on my filmmaking skills and focus on each aspect that the different classes offer. I feel I have learned a lot over the past two years, and it never hurts to brush up on the fundamentals!
 

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