Full Sail, New York Film Academy, and other such schools

Kurt Wagner

Active Member
Hi everyone. I was wondering if anyone could offer some information on programs offered by non-university/colleges, such as Full Sail, New York Film Academy, and other such film programs where a degree is not offered?

Are these workshops really as hands-on as they advertise?

How informed are the instructors in both the teaching of film production as well as the teaching of how to find a job in the business?

Does anyone know of any other such film programs that they think is worth checking out?

Thanks to anyone who replies.
 

Kurt Wagner

Active Member
Hi everyone. I was wondering if anyone could offer some information on programs offered by non-university/colleges, such as Full Sail, New York Film Academy, and other such film programs where a degree is not offered?

Are these workshops really as hands-on as they advertise?

How informed are the instructors in both the teaching of film production as well as the teaching of how to find a job in the business?

Does anyone know of any other such film programs that they think is worth checking out?

Thanks to anyone who replies.
 
I haven't been that impressed with the level of work coming out of Full Sail. They do offer access to real-world equipment, but honestly, if you want to make your own movies, you will get more hands-on time and experience doing it yourself on your own time. I tend to think the atmosphere of any "school" like that forces you to spend too much time dealing with red tape and not enough time shooting or editing. You probably still have to find people to act in your films, which basically puts you at the same level as someone in a normal college with a decent camera who does short films.
 

Dallas Morgan

New Member
HEy,
I'm currently checking out the LA Film School. I just visited the facilities a few weeks ago and it's amazing. I used to be pretty stubborn about film schools, until I realized that you have to learn the rules in order to break them. And plus the relationships you make at a film program are going to be priceless when it comes to getting into the industry. I've always believed that "It's WHO ya know that gets you in, and it's WHAT you know that keeps you in."

I've seen some films out of the NYFA and they were pretty crappy from what I saw. The 15min. thesis project that i saw from The LA Film School was very impressive. So check the school out, i'm probably going to be going nextfall.

That is all for now.

My name is DAllas Morgan
 

Josh

Active Member
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dallas Morgan:
I've seen some films out of the NYFA and they were pretty crappy from what I saw. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yeah, well not everyone who goes to NYFA is the next Speilberg, my friend. I've seen some crappy films out of NYU, too. Doesn't mean it's bad place.
 

Joey

New Member
I am in my second month at the Los Angeles Film School.

The key to any film school is how much you put into it. If you bust your *** then you will learn so much and you will be exposed to people that you couldnt meet any other way. if you lag *** and dont take every project you do seriously then you will fail not only in school but in the industry as well.

With that said, I have nothing but complements for the LAFS. The first day you arrive you are checked out an XL2 and you are assigned your first project, due only 4 days later. In your first term you take classes in every disciple before choosing an area of emphasis or major. Alot of people that are looking at film schools think that this is a draw back of this school, but let me put a different spin on this. I think this makes the school much stronger as it forces you to learn everything you can in that one subject therefore better preparing you to enter into the work place. My production teacher said it best, "someone who thinks they can do it all is a master of nothing and a jack of idiocy."

The school is oriented toward the studio system as most of the teachers work withinthat structure. Before going to the school you have to know exactly what you want to get out of your experience. If you know that then you will go to film school, kick some major *** and then get a great job out of school.

Now let me talk about the best part of this school and those how have visited may know. The best part is the access to equipment. The majority of your first quarter films are shot onthe cannon XL2, but you are able to take full advantage of these great cams as the school also has the necessary lenses to achieve that exact look you want. They also just got the ps adapater which allows the xl2 to use 35mm lenses, furthering the film look. The school also has arri and panavision 35mm cams and 16mm as well. They also have 3 sony hdf-900s the same hi def cams used in collateral. Plus access you any lights and gripping eqiup you need to use on their 2 soundstages.

For editing they have 2 labs with Avid Xpress Studio Pro. Then 2 systems with Avid Nitris and finally one Avid Nitris DS, thats professional, hd ready editing.

There is more and more, and no i dont work ffor the school, i am just throughly please with what i have experienced so far and from everything i have heard it only gets better.
 
Joey,

What's the project production like? Are you assigned groups to work in, with people from different areas? How many per group, usually? Do you have to find your own actors, or is there a talent pool to act in the projects?
 

Joey

New Member
Evan,
For your first three projs, you are assigned groups after that its up to you to make your own groups to work with. Say you want to direct you sort of group yourself with people that want to do the other positions. I am directing a short this week and prob dping another. There are usually five or so per group, but its really limitless.

you also do excercise assignments within your class structure. for instance this week we had an assignemnt in cinematography 1 which we shot in class, to demonstrate the master shot technique.

concerning actors, the school does a general casting call and builds a pretty good book, but you are on your own contacting them and using them. however for the most part they are usually great to work with and are in the same boat we are, learning and just wanting experience.
 

Christine

Member
i started the one year filmmaking program at NYFA this past july and am in in the last several weeks of the second semester.

i have learned and done so much! the website/brochure for the NYFA is NOT kidding when they say the program is intensive and hands on....VERY hands on! the first day of classes you already have had your hands on a camera and you have your first project to shoot over the weekend after the very first week of classes.

someone who posted on this thread said that the work they've seen on this site coming from nyfa is crap. well, it depends on the individual student filmmaker...NOT the school! some students are just more focused and motivated than others. NYFA accepts really anyone who applies and sadly, i see students here who are there just cuz they thought it'd be "cool" to be a film student and just don't fully appreciate the opportunity they have.

i, for one, have busted my a** these past several months. it is not easy and i am more often than not very tired, but the satisfaction that comes with actually SEEING something on screen that started out as an idea in your head is incredible! i also marvel at just how much i've learned and how much my storytelling/communication skills have improved...it just makes me want to learn and do more! i cannot wait to start writng my thesis scipt into a feature length screenplay...that is something that i would've been to frightened to think of doing several months ago!

another thing i never expected to happen during my time at nyfa...making new really close friends! your classmates become second family and are incredibly supportive. i never woulda thought a year ago that one of my best friends would be a classmate from japan or that i would learn to cuss in spanish from a mexican classmate!
 

Joey

New Member
the la film school costs 30,400 for the year long program. about the same as nyfa, you also have to factor in thesis costs and living expenses.
 

1oo9oo3

New Member
hey Durden, I notced you're in O'Fallon. I'm in Kansas City ... maybe we can chat sometime about a collaborative effort or something.
 
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> I've seen some crappy films out of NYU, too. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
You must have been watching mine.
 

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