Advice Showreel confusions

Hi,

I'm applying for University applications. My Showreel is of 16:9, I have used some shots in my showreel which were shot in 4:3 only camera type but while edit export I cropped top n bottom and made it 16:9 and this is the only format I have of them now.

My worry is,
(A) What could possibly the best professional and correct answer I can have for having a 4:3 shot footage as 16:9 without pillar boxes? (I have to made up a correct reverse methodology to tell them of my working process…as cropping is usually prohibited)
(B) Is 4:3 stretch is really acceptable in professional industry and an accepted practice?
(C) Also, Visuals starts off in my showreel after 10 secs, as I have included Timestamp slide before starting of visuals, would that be a problem. In of the article for showreel tip it was mentioned that showreels where visuals do not appear before 10 secs get rejected. But the prog. I applied ,does not have any such requirement but just the max total length of showreel. Kindly give some insight regarding it too.

Kindly help with this I am really nervous about the aspect ratio mistake I have done and looking for appropriate cover up that how come I have a footage shot in 4:3 but have final output as 16:9 without pillar boxing and cropping and distortion of framing.

Regards
 

llueve

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Hi Isabella,

Hopefully you are feeling better about your showreel by this point. Nevertheless, I don't want to leave you hanging, as applications are stressful enough already, so here are my opinions:

(A) Tell the truth with calm and self-reflection. I've made a few big (BIG) mistakes working as a professional Assistant Editor and although it is embarrassing, I have owned up to each one, apologized, and moved forward best as possible. I personally prefer an honest apology or acknowledgement of a mistake than a BS cover-up!

(B) In my experience in the US film industry, 4:3 stretch is not used.

(C) It's hard to speak to your case without knowing your program, but if there's a timestamp slide (not sure what that is -- a slate, I take it) for the first 10 seconds and then your show reel starts, it seems to me that will be fine. Kind of long for a slate, but not huge problem. If you are still concerned about this, you can try to reach out to the Admissions office of your program to give them a warning about this; it may or may not work.

Chin up, deep breaths, and good luck!
 
Thanks llueve for the feedback.

A) Will do that.
B) Noted
C) Slide means insertion clip, before starting of visuals I have given Title, then have written what does the showreel consists at which timestamp, then gave my one line statement regarding my approach towards work. After that, then the visuals (the show-reel) starts. I also, do not see an issue with this when I am already telling them that at which timecode what is there for them. But then every every person has their moods and cant really gauge if they will be making an issue out of this or not specially when there is not any such instruction that visuals should start before 10 sec. I only started worrying when I was reading an article of tips for showreel (not for any specific University just a general guidance by some film student) that Profs. or Admin staff reject applications or showreel if visuals dsnt start within 10 secs.
 

llueve

Well-Known Member
Supporter
C) Slide means insertion clip, before starting of visuals I have given Title, then have written what does the showreel consists at which timestamp, then gave my one line statement regarding my approach towards work. After that, then the visuals (the show-reel) starts. I also, do not see an issue with this when I am already telling them that at which timecode what is there for them. But then every every person has their moods and cant really gauge if they will be making an issue out of this or not specially when there is not any such instruction that visuals should start before 10 sec. I only started worrying when I was reading an article of tips for showreel (not for any specific University just a general guidance by some film student) that Profs. or Admin staff reject applications or showreel if visuals dsnt start within 10 secs.

I see, I get what you're saying. It sounds like you did your best, you provided an intro, and although it may not be the favorite thing for some admissions folks, it doesn't necessarily mean your work won't be watched. You've done the hardest part already, which is finishing your application! I'm rooting for you and hope your work is watched.
 

Latest Accepted Applications

Latest Applications

Latest reviews

  • Hofstra University - Department of Radio, Television, Film
    5.00 star(s)
    Quality Facilities, Caring Professors
    Great school that prepares you for the New York film and television scene. The facilities are state of the art and the teachers are top notch.
    • joekgilberto
  • Emerson College
    3.00 star(s)
    Go if you have a sizable scholarship
    Ultimately glad I went, but my overall experience at Emerson felt very lackluster. The courses were good, but nothing really worth sinking almost...
    • Anonymous
  • USC School of Cinematic Arts (BA/BFA)
    5.00 star(s)
    A Journey Most Illuminating
    I started my USC adventure as a Theatre major. I quickly discovered that I needed to change paths, and film had always been of interest. I thought...
    • JHD
  • London Film School (LFS) - Directing Summer School with Udayan Prasad
    5.00 star(s)
    Great Filmmaking Intensive, Though Pricey
    I attended this summer program in 2019. I wanted to try out directing in an environment where I would get feedback on my work and where I could...
    • llueve
  • Northwestern University - School of Communication
    4.00 star(s)
    Good for film theory, not so much for production
    *Please take this with a grain of salt, as I went to NU over a decade ago. While I was there: Classes in film theory and screenwriting were great...
    • Anonymous

Latest Accepted Applications

Top