Will AI make what film school teaches us obsolete?

Sasha1988

New Member
I was wondering what people’s thoughts are about the changes to our field with AI and investing in such an expensive education, when the methods of film making we would learn at AFI may be obsolete in the next…who knows, 10 years?
Yes you will need people who are knowledgeable about the process of filmmaking, who can enter the prompts, but it’s really hard to imagine a scenario in which a ton of jobs aren’t eliminated.
Thoughts?
 
Has anyone seen this? 🤯


Crazy to think what this means for the film industry. No wonder the writer's guild wanted those changes.
 
I was wondering what people’s thoughts are about the changes to our field with AI and investing in such an expensive education, when the methods of film making we would learn at AFI may be obsolete in the next…who knows, 10 years?
Yes you will need people who are knowledgeable about the process of filmmaking, who can enter the prompts, but it’s really hard to imagine a scenario in which a ton of jobs aren’t eliminated.
Thoughts?
I'm not an AI expert and have only a very shallow understanding of AI, knowing only its categories and approximate meanings (e.g., ANI, AGI, ASI, etc.). Therefore, my views below don't have a lot of reference value but are simply the thoughts of an ordinary filmmaker and storyteller within the limited knowledge at present.

I think existing AI will undoubtedly change the industry as well as the world, and probably at a faster speed than people can imagine. However, the way in which existing AI changes the industry and the world and the final effect are still indeterminate (at least within my current stage of knowledge). But until ASI - Artificial superintelligence (Artificial Intelligence with self-awareness and the ability to update itself through continuous autonomous learning) is created, I am optimistic that AI will not be able to completely replace the industry and filmmakers. After all, the industry is still about creativity and storytelling at its core - that is, things that are based on complex experiences and reflections drawn from individuals and societies. Stories are created by conscious individuals through their own life experiences, the complex information they receive, and many things that are not known to existing humans through artistic processing (explaining storytelling or art in relatively rational terms here is a ridiculous behavior because firstly, the language itself is limited, and secondly, I'm just an ordinary individual with a very limited knowledge of it). Existing AI seems to be unable to surpass humans in this regard to become better Storytellers or Artists than humans. However, after the creation of Artificial superintelligence, that could be a much more complicated situation, which I can't analyze or predict. In many movies, the primary mission of a self-aware Artificial superintelligence seems to be to destroy and replace humans. I think it has a strong fundamental relationship with western religion and culture. As an Easterner, I feel somewhat differently, but I don't know how to describe it specifically (hahaha). Overall, I think this concern about Artificial superintelligence is just one of a myriad of possibilities. Also, it should be a long time before the birth of Artificial superintelligence, I've heard some people say that it's more realistic to worry about Mars being overpopulated to the point than to worry about Artificial superintelligence killing the human race and taking over the world (I don't know if that's true, just what I've heard). Anyway, it's a very complex issue.

Getting back to our present-day AI, it looks like the perceived reality of AI seems to be focused on replacing in physical and intellectual labor, i.e., producing direct economic value, which is not all of the value created by humans. It may happen that for some jobs that rely primarily on purely human labor, a scenario where AI replaces humans near-completely will be more likely to be realized (and of course the reality of replacement is now in place in some industries). For the advertising industry or the short video industry, the possibility of existing AI replacing human labor is indeed high - after all, these moving images are firstly short and secondly unfortunately competitive in terms of eye-catching. Therefore, I think the current advertising industry and short videos may lead to a huge change, after all, AI like Sora can really drastically cut down the production cost or solve some very tricky realities, and at the same time create more economic benefits. I'm not a practitioner in this type of industry, so my opinion is also that of an outsider.

For people working in the movie industry within the traditional definition, I think that now seems to be a good and necessary time to rethink the future direction. Even though there are many problems in the industry right now, it seems to be a more necessary time than before for a shift. For example, films that have been sold in recent years on the basis of thrilling visual effects and restricted content such as blood and violence, but which in fact tell cheesy formulaic stories, may be fast becoming obsolete. This is because it is likely that these visual effects will be easily realized in the future through AI, and viewers will quickly grow tired of them (and there are already quite a number of people who have already become tired of them). I'm also thinking about the future direction. I don't see existing AI as the enemy, I'm more interested in learning how to use it better, like a painter getting a completely different brush. But I honestly don't know what's going to happen or what to do after the creation of Artificial superintelligence. The good news is that technology is changing, but human nature is not, and audiences want good stories. Also, the bad news is that because AI is also being utilized and developed by human beings at this stage. And human nature...is hard to trust.

Lastly, different people have different reasons for going to a film school, and of course it's completely ok not to go to film school to become a brilliant filmmaker (after all, it's expensive and there's a possibility you won't learn a lot of things about filmmaking). But for me, a young man from the remotest part of China, I think going to a film school in the western world is an easy choice to make. Because I have almost no opportunity to make movies in my hometown and I am not rich, and filmmaking is still a teamwork (I need to find collaborators). It is a gamble for me to go to AFI (because it is expensive), but I decided to take the risk and work hard (If I can get in, hhhh). I'm a pessimist, but this choice seemed like a positive one for me. After all, I don't even know when I'm even going to die, it could be tomorrow or many years from now. So why not take the chance to take a chance that I can see, I think.

I hope I won't bore you guys with such a long message. Good luck and have a good day!
 
I'm not an AI expert and have only a very shallow understanding of AI, knowing only its categories and approximate meanings (e.g., ANI, AGI, ASI, etc.). Therefore, my views below don't have a lot of reference value but are simply the thoughts of an ordinary filmmaker and storyteller within the limited knowledge at present.

I think existing AI will undoubtedly change the industry as well as the world, and probably at a faster speed than people can imagine. However, the way in which existing AI changes the industry and the world and the final effect are still indeterminate (at least within my current stage of knowledge). But until ASI - Artificial superintelligence (Artificial Intelligence with self-awareness and the ability to update itself through continuous autonomous learning) is created, I am optimistic that AI will not be able to completely replace the industry and filmmakers. After all, the industry is still about creativity and storytelling at its core - that is, things that are based on complex experiences and reflections drawn from individuals and societies. Stories are created by conscious individuals through their own life experiences, the complex information they receive, and many things that are not known to existing humans through artistic processing (explaining storytelling or art in relatively rational terms here is a ridiculous behavior because firstly, the language itself is limited, and secondly, I'm just an ordinary individual with a very limited knowledge of it). Existing AI seems to be unable to surpass humans in this regard to become better Storytellers or Artists than humans. However, after the creation of Artificial superintelligence, that could be a much more complicated situation, which I can't analyze or predict. In many movies, the primary mission of a self-aware Artificial superintelligence seems to be to destroy and replace humans. I think it has a strong fundamental relationship with western religion and culture. As an Easterner, I feel somewhat differently, but I don't know how to describe it specifically (hahaha). Overall, I think this concern about Artificial superintelligence is just one of a myriad of possibilities. Also, it should be a long time before the birth of Artificial superintelligence, I've heard some people say that it's more realistic to worry about Mars being overpopulated to the point than to worry about Artificial superintelligence killing the human race and taking over the world (I don't know if that's true, just what I've heard). Anyway, it's a very complex issue.

Getting back to our present-day AI, it looks like the perceived reality of AI seems to be focused on replacing in physical and intellectual labor, i.e., producing direct economic value, which is not all of the value created by humans. It may happen that for some jobs that rely primarily on purely human labor, a scenario where AI replaces humans near-completely will be more likely to be realized (and of course the reality of replacement is now in place in some industries). For the advertising industry or the short video industry, the possibility of existing AI replacing human labor is indeed high - after all, these moving images are firstly short and secondly unfortunately competitive in terms of eye-catching. Therefore, I think the current advertising industry and short videos may lead to a huge change, after all, AI like Sora can really drastically cut down the production cost or solve some very tricky realities, and at the same time create more economic benefits. I'm not a practitioner in this type of industry, so my opinion is also that of an outsider.

For people working in the movie industry within the traditional definition, I think that now seems to be a good and necessary time to rethink the future direction. Even though there are many problems in the industry right now, it seems to be a more necessary time than before for a shift. For example, films that have been sold in recent years on the basis of thrilling visual effects and restricted content such as blood and violence, but which in fact tell cheesy formulaic stories, may be fast becoming obsolete. This is because it is likely that these visual effects will be easily realized in the future through AI, and viewers will quickly grow tired of them (and there are already quite a number of people who have already become tired of them). I'm also thinking about the future direction. I don't see existing AI as the enemy, I'm more interested in learning how to use it better, like a painter getting a completely different brush. But I honestly don't know what's going to happen or what to do after the creation of Artificial superintelligence. The good news is that technology is changing, but human nature is not, and audiences want good stories. Also, the bad news is that because AI is also being utilized and developed by human beings at this stage. And human nature...is hard to trust.

Lastly, different people have different reasons for going to a film school, and of course it's completely ok not to go to film school to become a brilliant filmmaker (after all, it's expensive and there's a possibility you won't learn a lot of things about filmmaking). But for me, a young man from the remotest part of China, I think going to a film school in the western world is an easy choice to make. Because I have almost no opportunity to make movies in my hometown and I am not rich, and filmmaking is still a teamwork (I need to find collaborators). It is a gamble for me to go to AFI (because it is expensive), but I decided to take the risk and work hard (If I can get in, hhhh). I'm a pessimist, but this choice seemed like a positive one for me. After all, I don't even know when I'm even going to die, it could be tomorrow or many years from now. So why not take the chance to take a chance that I can see, I think.

I hope I won't bore you guys with such a long message. Good luck and have a good day!
You don't need artificial super intelligence to eliminate the need for a physical set. And yes, I also doubt that AI could actually tell a good story but the studios don't care about artistic integrity as long as the film makes money.

Many people in tech say that the filmmaking process will more closely resemble the video game building process in the coming years. So I was just wondering what people's thought are on spending all the time and money on film school now, when the technology is changing so rapidly, and will almost certainly lead to the elimination of many jobs.
 
You don't need artificial super intelligence to eliminate the need for a physical set. And yes, I also doubt that AI could actually tell a good story but the studios don't care about artistic integrity as long as the film makes money.

Many people in tech say that the filmmaking process will more closely resemble the video game building process in the coming years. So I was just wondering what people's thought are on spending all the time and money on film school now, when the technology is changing so rapidly, and will almost certainly lead to the elimination of many jobs.
I can’t speak specifically for the film industry, but coming from a background in architecture, it’s generally understood that AI could (most likely will) be used as a great tool in design fields in the future. It will certainly not take the place of the amount of jobs you may think it would at first glance. Yes, AI is powerful and impressive. It is also tricky to manipulate and hard to perfect. I can see it being used heavily in conceptual stages of projects, including filmmaking, to cut down on time and manpower. Especially within the art department. An amazing instance of this already in play is photoshop’s generative fill. It is a life saver and saves literal hours of time, but you still need a human behind the screen to perfect it. Tools like these can be beneficial to creators, let’s just hope AI doesn't get so advanced that it replaces us 😅🤞
 
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I have to say, I think you’re underestimating. I’m not saying that AI will make movies start to finish. I’m saying that it’s likely that physical sets will become a thing of the past at major studios, and the number of people necessary to crew a film will decrease. Just to use one department as an example - HMU. I think there will still be a HMU job on every project, but the job will be to use AI to do hair and makeup on the AI “actor.”

After all, a huge victory that the studios won after last years SAG -AFTRA strike is that they can now make digital replicas of talent and background actors to provide input for AI. If there are no actors, you don’t need a physical set. Looking at this as a producer, if you don’t have a physical set, you don’t have to have to pay for permits, locations, location scouts, parking, craft services, lodging for talent and crew, insurance…the list goes on and on. You also don’t have to pay someone to coordinate these kinds of things, which is a huge part of my job as a producer. Then there’s everything AI could do in post. If you think the studios wouldn’t jump on the chance to cut these costs you’d be naive.

Yeah the technology is not there today, but look at how far it’s come in 1 year. And yes I agree that AI is an incredibly powerful tool, but there are zero protections in place to suggest that workers will be the ones to benefit from this power.

Meta’s video game development department is a great example of a studio using AI to dramatically cut costs and decrease labor needs. A successful video game director there told me that his team was able to accomplish work at more than 3x the human rate when they used AI. Who do you think enjoyed those savings? Certainly not the contract workers who rely on a day rate.

I have wanted to be a filmmaker my entire life and I think that human beings making movies is a beautiful process. But I am quite worried about all this and if I end up getting accepted to AFI I would love to talk to someone there who can maybe address some of my concerns. Tbh I think the only way to remain relevant in our field will be to learn how to use AI to do the job.
 
No one can address your concerns because no one can predict the future. People can only give their opinions based on their perception. And you seem like you already made up your mind, honestly. Technology will make tons of jobs obsolete in every industry, not just filmmaking. At the end of the day, no one can guarantee you anything, you can take the plunge or not take the plunge, up to you.
 
This is a great conversation; I think it would be good to dedicate this topic to its own thread on this page rather than the AFI 2024 admissions thread so it can expand.
 
👀👀👀


In an interview between shoots Thursday, Perry explained his concerns about the technology’s impact on labor and why he wants the industry to come together to tackle AI: “There’s got to be some sort of regulations in order to protect us. If not, I just don’t see how we survive.”
 
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