Chapman MFA Filmmaking

ElleGee

Member
Supporting Member
So we do, in fact, register ourselves? I emailed Dodge about this because I was confused as well.
 
So we do, in fact, register ourselves? I emailed Dodge about this because I was confused as well.
Apparently you register for SW557 yourself and then the college enrolls you into the rest of the courses for Fall 2019. We'll know our actual schedule before orientation.
 
Apparently you register for SW557 yourself and then the college enrolls you into the rest of the courses for Fall 2019. We'll know our actual schedule before orientation.
Also, there is a link to the student portal in the registration email from a few days ago. In the portal, you'll find all the instructions for how to register for each program. Since mine is Screenwriting, the instructions told me to register for SW557 and the college would enroll me in the rest. Hope that helps!
 

ElleGee

Member
Supporting Member
Also, there is a link to the student portal in the registration email from a few days ago. In the portal, you'll find all the instructions for how to register for each program. Since mine is Screenwriting, the instructions told me to register for SW557 and the college would enroll me in the rest. Hope that helps!
Yeah, I got that. I’m in a different program (TV Writing & Producing) and my letter said “you should register for these courses” but then I also saw something about meeting with a program advisor first. So i just wasn’t sure. I was able to register for all the classes on my list, though. So I guess I did it right lol.
 
Do we have a housing thread going? And does anyone know what Orange is like?
 

alanray

Active Member
Do we have a housing thread going? And does anyone know what Orange is like?
Orange is a really nice town. Pretty safe place, lots of pretty areas and good restaurants. Basically anywhere in California is pricy compared to most other states but Orange area will be a lot cheaper and nicer than say LA. Lots of freeways out here to get wherever you need to go easy, but traffic is super ass.
 

Laika

Member
Hey guys, I'm admitted in the 2019 directing MFA program and I'm here to discuss with you about one thing really important to me. Honestly, I have a strong preference to indie films or art films and I'm quite sure that's what I want to focus on in the future. I've heard Chapman has the best equipment and countless chances to improve its students practical experiences. But I'm a little bit worried about the teaching style is so commercial that I cannot adapt to it. What do you think? Is here anyone having the same concern with me?
 

kid_a2

Member
Hey guys, I'm admitted in the 2019 directing MFA program and I'm here to discuss with you about one thing really important to me. Honestly, I have a strong preference to indie films or art films and I'm quite sure that's what I want to focus on in the future. I've heard Chapman has the best equipment and countless chances to improve its students practical experiences. But I'm a little bit worried about the teaching style is so commercial that I cannot adapt to it. What do you think? Is here anyone having the same concern with me?
This viewpoint may not be shared amongst others here, but for me storytelling is storytelling, whether you're working with a $100m budget or a $10k budget. If you can't nail the story you're trying to tell then it doesn't matter whether you think your film is artsy or commercial.

I think the designation of films being considered "indie" or "art" is disingenuous to filmmaking. The terms are generally applied to films giving the implication it's superior somehow. The reality is that it comes down to how it's financed and that's it.

There are plenty of completely terrible movies that would be considered indie or artsy films, just as there are plenty of big-budget films that simultaneously make money and are considered artistic achievements i.e. Dunkirk.

I'd recommend not limiting yourself by worrying about what are ultimately meaningless labels on storytelling/filmmaking.
 

Laika

Member
This viewpoint may not be shared amongst others here, but for me storytelling is storytelling, whether you're working with a $100m budget or a $10k budget. If you can't nail the story you're trying to tell then it doesn't matter whether you think your film is artsy or commercial.

I think the designation of films being considered "indie" or "art" is disingenuous to filmmaking. The terms are generally applied to films giving the implication it's superior somehow. The reality is that it comes down to how it's financed and that's it.

There are plenty of completely terrible movies that would be considered indie or artsy films, just as there are plenty of big-budget films that simultaneously make money and are considered artistic achievements i.e. Dunkirk.

I'd recommend not limiting yourself by worrying about what are ultimately meaningless labels on storytelling/filmmaking.
Thanks for your suggestion! It's very insightful. I totally agree with the idea that the story itself is always the most important thing and there're plenty of brilliant works like Dunkirk can make a balance between box office and personal style. But to me, how to narrate is almost as important as what to narrate. In my own view, a film is such a complex art form, including literature, visual art, audio art and so on; and to some degree, many films actually tell the "same" story. (Sry I'm not sure if I make myself clear.) For this reason, how to tell a story in somebody's own way is also crucial. And what I'm exactly wondering is that would we be taught how to tell a good story in our own way or just about those models which are already tested by the audience and the film market?
I'm quite sure that Dodge is one of the most brilliant film school. Just wondering if I can make a fit for this program.
Thank you for your recommendation again. : )
 

Tugger

Member
Supporting Member
Thanks for your suggestion! It's very insightful. I totally agree with the idea that the story itself is always the most important thing and there're plenty of brilliant works like Dunkirk can make a balance between box office and personal style. But to me, how to narrate is almost as important as what to narrate. In my own view, a film is such a complex art form, including literature, visual art, audio art and so on; and to some degree, many films actually tell the "same" story. (Sry I'm not sure if I make myself clear.) For this reason, how to tell a story in somebody's own way is also crucial. And what I'm exactly wondering is that would we be taught how to tell a good story in our own way or just about those models which are already tested by the audience and the film market?
I'm quite sure that Dodge is one of the most brilliant film school. Just wondering if I can make a fit for this program.
Thank you for your recommendation again. : )
I'm not so sure on how the professors would feel about the indie story, but I think the main thing I would think is if you can find a crew that can also help your vision. But I would maybe email them and ask if there are any restrictions on what stories you tell.
 

Tugger

Member
Supporting Member
In other news... I found if I spend around 900 in rent, and was able to work part time the total cost of attendance is 150,000... Still trying to decide if that's worth it.
 

ElleGee

Member
Supporting Member
In other news... I found if I spend around 900 in rent, and was able to work part time the total cost of attendance is 150,000... Still trying to decide if that's worth it.
Yeah. Sounds about right lol. What are you leaning towards?
 

Tugger

Member
Supporting Member
Yeah. Sounds about right lol. What are you leaning towards?
I'm not sure... lol. I posted to Reddit a while back to see what their advice would be to go into that much debt. Some said their art teachers said "never go to art school unless they are paying your tuition" -- Also thought about deferring and then applying to more next year as I really only applied to 2 this year. I've been in limbo of trying to figure it out for the past 2 months lol
 

ElleGee

Member
Supporting Member
I'm not sure... lol. I posted to Reddit a while back to see what their advice would be to go into that much debt. Some said their art teachers said "never go to art school unless they are paying your tuition" -- Also thought about deferring and then applying to more next year as I really only applied to 2 this year. I've been in limbo of trying to figure it out for the past 2 months lol
The debt aspect is certainly a lot to consider. If you’re on the fence deferral sounds like a good option. It could buy you time and you’d still have a spot next year?
 
not to distract from the ongoing threads about tugger and laika, but I was wondering who on here will be in screenwriting next fall?
 

alanray

Active Member
not to distract from the ongoing threads about tugger and laika, but I was wondering who on here will be in screenwriting next fall?
Me over here lol
 

KaturdayNighFever

New Member
not to distract from the ongoing threads about tugger and laika, but I was wondering who on here will be in screenwriting next fall?
I will be
 

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